UNEP
UNEP DTIE OzonAction BranchOzonAction Programme
 
 

20th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol Awards

During the 20th Anniversary celebrations held just prior and during the 19th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, the UNEP Division of Technology, Industry and Economics, its OzonAction Branch, and staff received awards in the following categories:

Furthermore, several partners received awards in the following category for work linked directly to cooperation with OzonAction:

The final list of awardees for all award categories are presented in the follwoing books on the Ozone Secretariat web site):

  • Awards Book
  • Recognition of some of the Exemplary Projects that have been undertaken pursuant to Article 10 of the Montreal Protocol

This page also includes photos of some of these award presentations.

Outstanding Contributors Awards
Recognizing the extraordinary contributions of those who have taken the vision of the founders and advanced it to address current issues


Mr. Per Menzony Bakken

 
Mr. Per Menzony Bakken was an active participant in the negotiations that led to the creation of the Montreal Protocol. As a representative of Norway, his efforts helped bring the countries negotiating the Protocol to consensus. Later, as a manager of the UNEP Division of Technology, Industry and Economics, he helped implement the Executive Committee’s policy on regionalization and creation of the compliance assistance programme.

Mr. Rajendra Shende
Rajendra Shende
Mr. Rajendra Shende has worked tirelessly for almost 15 years for UNEP and the cause of ozone protection. His management of the OzonAction group has enabled UNEP to play a central role in building the capacity of Parties operating under Article 5 of the Protocol and enabling them to comply with the Protocol.
 
Implementers Awards
Recognizing extraordinary contributions by national ozone units or individuals, whose hard work at the country level has helped to make the Protocol’s phase-out goals a reality
Mr. Geoffrey Tierney
Mr. Geoffrey Tierney
Mr. Geoffrey Tierney has contributed significantly to the implementation of the Protocol through his effective work in both the United Kingdom and the European Commission, his effective advocacy in meetings of the Parties and the Executive Committee, and his assistance to Parties as coordinator of the UNEP OzonAction regional network system.
 
Partners Awards
Recognizing the work of civil society and international organizations that have played a critical role in the development or implementation of the Montreal Protocol

Green Customs Initiative and the Parties to the Montreal Protocol

Green Customs Initiative
Green Customs Initiative and the Parties to the Montreal Protocol have participated in a partnership that has benefited both the Protocol and several other multilateral environmental agreements in their efforts to track trade in items of interest.
 
Implementing Agency and Staff Awards
In recognition of extraordinary assistance to developing countries in the global effort to phase out ozone-depleting substances and protect the ozone layer

UNEP OzonAction Programme (agency award)

UNEP OzonAction Programme

Mr. Abdulelah Alwadaee
Mr. Abdulelah Alwadaee
Mr. Abdulelah Alwadaee has been working with the UNEP OzonAction Programme for the last five years as Regional Network Coordinator for the West Asia Region, assisting 12 countries in the region, introducing ozone activities to the Gulf Cooperation Council and the League of Arab States, and collaborating with non-Parties, such as Iraq and the Occupied Palestinian Territory.

Mr. Atul Bagai
Mr. Atul Bagai
Mr. Atul Bagai has been working with the UNEP OzonAction Programme since 2000, serving for the last five years as Regional Network Coordinator for South Asia, assisting the compliance of 12 countries. With enthusiastic commitment, he has developed innovative mechanisms, such as the “Sky Hole Patching” project and projects to prevent illegal trade.

Mr. Jérémy Boubié Bazyé
Mr. Jérémy Boubié Bazyé
Mr. Jérémy Boubié Bazyé has been with the UNEP OzonAction Programme for over 10 years as Regional Network Coordinator for the French-speaking African region. He has assisted the 27 countries of the region in putting the issue of ozone protection in their national development agendas and has contributed to the harmonization of regional trade regulations.

Ms. Jo Chona
Ms. Jo Chona
Ms. Jo Chona has been working with the UNEP OzonAction Programme since 1994 as a Programme Assistant for Networking and Information Exchange. In particular, she has enthusiastically developed the OzonAction multi-media collection and an excellent
internet-based “ozone quote” site.

Ms. Ludgarde Coppens
Ms. Ludgarde Coppens
Ms. Ludgarde Coppens has been working with the UNEP OzonAction Programme in the South Asia and Pacific region since 2000, in the post of Policy Enforcement Officer during the past five years. She has excelled in, among other things, assisting the 27 countries of the region in setting up licensing systems and ozone-depleting-substance-related policies and regulations.

Mr. James Stevens Curlin
Mr. James Stevens Curlin
Mr. James Stevens Curlin, Information Manager, has been working with the UNEP OzonAction Programme since 1992. Among other accomplishments, he has been responsible for the development of the outstanding OzonAction International Information Clearinghouse, the first such successful clearinghouse under any multilateral environmental agreement.

Ms. Samira de Gobert
Ms. Samira de Gobert
Ms. Samira de Gobert has worked for OzonAction for nearly 10 years as Media and Information Assistant. She has done outstanding work in providing the Parties and the media with information on ozone. Her work has included the electronic newsletters OzoNews, Clio3-on Ozone and Climate linkage, and Rumba on Methyl Bromide.

Ms. Artie Dubrie
Ms. Artie Dubrie
Ms. Artie Dubrie has been working with the UNEP OzonAction Programme for five years as Policy Enforcement Officer in the Latin America and Caribbean region. She has been hugely successful in assisting the 23 countries of the region in setting up licensing systems and ozone-depleting substance policies and regulations.

Ms. Anne Fenner
Ms. Anne Fenner
Ms. Anne Fenner has been working with the UNEP OzonAction Programme since 2003 as Information Officer. Her dedicated work has helped demystify the science of ozone layer protection
and enabled the development of exceptional education tools for school children and young people, including education packs, cartoon books and videos.

Ms. Maria Ghoneim
Ms. Maria Ghoneim
Ms. Maria Ghoneim has been working with the UNEP OzonAction Programme since its launch in 1991. With enthusiastic commitment and dedication, she has contributed to the office management of the Programme throughout its phenomenal expansion from a staff of three persons to more than 50 in five regions.

Mr. Yamar Guissé
Mr. Yamar Guissé
Mr. Yamar Guissé has been working with the UNEP OzonAction Programme in Africa as Refrigerant Management Plan Officer for the last five years. He has had considerable success in his work assisting African countries in developing refrigerant management plans to enable compliance with the Protocol.

Mr. Thanavat Junchaya
Mr. Thanavat Junchaya
Mr. Thanavat Junchaya has been working with the UNEP OzonAction Programme since 1998 as Regional Network Coordinator of the Southeast Asia and Pacific, assisting the 11 countries in that region. He has steadfastly demonstrated the effectiveness of regional networking.

Mr. Halvart Koeppen
Mr. Halvart Koeppen
Mr. Halvart Koeppen has been working for the UNEP OzonAction Programme since 1997, for the last two years as Regional Network Coordinator for Eastern Europe and Central Asia, assisting the 13 countries in the region. He has, among other things, developed valuable training manuals and training programmes for customs officers.

Mr. Rajendra Shende
Mr. Rajendra Shende
Mr. Rajendra Shende has worked tirelessly for almost fifteen years for UNEP and the cause of ozone protection. His management of the OzonAction group has enabled UNEP to play a central role in building the capacity of Parties operating under Article 5 and enabling their compliance with the Protocol.

Ms. Mugure Kibe Ursulet
Ms. Mugure Kibe Ursulet
Ms. Mugure Kibe Ursulet has been working with the UNEP OzonAction Programme since 1994. As Documentation Assistant, she took an active role in outreach activities.

Ms. Mirian Vega
Ms. Mirian Vega
Ms. Mirian Vega has been working for the last five years with the UNEP OzonAction Programme as Regional Network Coordinator for the Latin America and Caribbean region, assisting the 23 countries in the region and enabling South-South cooperation between large countries and small island countries.
 
Exemplary Projects undertaken Pursuant to Article 10 of the Montreal Protocol
Exemplary projects undertaken through the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol

Green Customs Initiative (GCI). Implementing agency: UNEP

Green Customs Initiative

It has long been understood that if Parties are to meet the requirements of the Montreal Protocol they must be able to control the movement of ozone-depleting substances across their borders. Indeed, effective implementation of many multilateral environmental agreements depends on effective border controls. The recognition of this need and the joint interest of the various multilateral environmental agreements in this area led UNEP to create the Green Customs Initiative, a pioneering partnership of five convention secretariats and three international organizations 1 that has contriuted to the implementation of the Montreal Protocol through its capacity-building activities for customs officers. By supporting this effort to train customs officers in developing countries, the Multilateral Fund has enabled the Montreal Protocol to play a key part in this cooperative effort, which has had the added benefit of increasing the visibility of the Montreal Protocol among customs services and promoting operational cooperation with other multilateral environmental agreements.

The initiative also helped introduce the ozone issue into the sustainable development arena and into debates on security, and offers a coordinated approach to building the capacity of customs officers to monitor trade in commodities of environmental concern. It has always included the monitoring of ozone-depleting substances as one of its objectives. The initiative has included provision of joint customs training focused on awareness-raising involving the various secretariats and organizations; the development of a training guide for capacity-building; the establishment of a website (www.greencustoms.org); and the conduct of national pilot projects.

The first train-the-trainer regional workshop under the initiative was held at the Shanghai Customs College in China in May 2007. The contributions of two individuals should be specifically recognized: Ms. Donata Rugarabamu (Basel Convention secretariat – Officer in Charge and Senior Legal Officer) and Mr. Stephen Nash (CITES secretariat – Chief, Capacity-building Unit). Both have been instrumental in the successful drafting of the Green Customs Training Guide and have brought their exceptional knowledge of multilateral environmental agreements and of customs to bear for the benefit of the GCI partnership.


Jamaica Refrigerant Management Plan (RMP) and Terminal Phase-out Management Plan (TPMP). Bilateral agency: Environment Canada. Implementing agencies: UNEP (for RMP) and UNDP (for TPMP)
Jamaica Refrigerant Management Plan (RMP) and Terminal Phase-out Management Plan (TPMP). Bilateral agency: Environment Canada. Implementing agencies: UNEP (for RMP) and UNDP (for TPMP)

By the end of the 1990s, CFC consumption in Jamaica was confined to the servicing of existing refrigeration and air conditioning equipment. The Government set itself an ambitious goal: to eliminate this CFC consumption completely by 31 December 2005, four years ahead of the phase-out schedule applicable to developing countries under the Montreal Protocol. This RMP project, implemented between 1999 and 2002, and the 2002–2006 work on the TPMP, which built on the achievements of the RMP, were the key projects approved under the Multilateral Fund to assist Jamaica in meeting its target of accelerated CFC
phase-out.

The RMP and the TPMP that followed transferred the expertise and technology required, both to reduce reliance on the use of CFCs in servicing refrigeration and air conditioning equipment and to facilitate the enforcement of the CFC import controls instituted by the Jamaican Government. Specifically, under the projects most of the country’s refrigeration technicians were trained in best practices; a code of practice for technicians was developed and made mandatory; CFC recovery and recycling machines were provided to as many technicians as possible; several CFC users who were not able or willing to convert their systems to alternatives on their own were provided with financial incentives to do so; and the safe use and handling of hydrocarbon refrigerants as CFC alternatives were introduced. The particular expertise developed in Jamaica with hydrocarbon refrigerants is now being shared with other countries in the English-speaking Caribbean region.

This project also saw the development and implementation of the first comprehensive training programme for customs officers, based on a draft training manual that had been developed by UNEP, with assistance from Canada and Finland. The experience with the customs officers’ train-the-trainers workshop in Jamaica provided essential information for refining the format and content of the training programme and finalizing the UNEP training manual for customs officers. These resources were then widely used and applied for the training of customs officers in most of the other Article 5 countries. Such training programmes have been key to ensuring that customs officers have the awareness, knowledge and skills necessary to implement the ODS import licensing systems which ensure countries’ compliance with their obligations under the Montreal Protocol.

The efforts of the Jamaican Government and industry stakeholders themselves were fundamental in ensuring that the country did ultimately meet its target of early phase-out and thus became the first country in Latin America and the Caribbean to eliminate CFC consumption completely. From the beginning of Jamaica’s country programme for the phase-out of ozone-depleting substances, the National Ozone Unit provided continuous and tireless leadership to promote the objectives of the Montreal Protocol and forged excellent relationships with key stakeholders in the refrigeration and air conditioning industry.

In this regard, the efforts of the National Ozone Unit, and in particular Ms. Veronica Alleyne, during the implementation of both the RMP and TPMP are particularly noteworthy. In addition, the Government set the framework for CFC phase-out by adopting clear and ambitious regulations (eventually grouped under an Ozone Act) and established a national ozone commission that was also instrumental in providing guidance and ensuring
development and implementation of all projects. Lastly, the association of refrigeration and air conditioning technicians played a decisive role in encouraging CFC users to switch early to alternatives and implement best refrigeration practices.

The total cost of the RMP and the TPMP that made the total phase-out possible amounted to approximately $485,000. The project has achieved its ultimate goals, as Jamaica completely eliminated CFC consumption as of 31 December 2005. The resources, equipment and training skills provided under the RMP and TPMP are now being used to address other refrigerants as the principal technical institutes have incorporated training in best practices within their curricula for training refrigeration and air conditioning technicians.


Guide for National Ozone Officers. Implementing agency: UNEP
Guide for National Ozone Officers. Implementing agency: UNEP

To date, the Multilateral Fund has supported the establishment of Guide for National Ozone Officersnational ozone units in over 140 countries. Among the goals of related projects are the hiring of at least one full-time individual to
enable each country to focus specifically on ozone issues. This individual is most commonly referred to as the National Ozone Officer. National ozone officers are very important individuals who are responsible for advancing the phase-out of ozone-depleting substances in their countries. In that role, they often help prepare regulations or legislation, and help facilitate the development and implementation of projects.

Over time, it became clear that there was a significant turnover in national ozone officers, and that the learning curve for new officers was very high. In an effort to address this, UNEP developed a Guide for National Ozone Officers that was designed to serve as a quick reference tool providing comprehensive knowledge. The Guide was developed using a participatory approach that drew on the experience of many national ozone units. First issued in 2006, it was judged to be a very good and useful tool. It contains the common wisdom of the ozone community and is the only such
document to have been developed to help officers carry out their obligations under the relevant multilateral environmental agreements.


China online training system. Implementing agencies: China State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA) and UNEP
China online training system. Implementing agencies: China State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA) and UNEP

When the Multilateral Fund approved a unique enforcement project for China, it was uncertain how the country would go about training the thousands of local and national authority officials who would be needed to ensure compliance with the Protocol. After due consideration, SEPA developed and initiated an innovative online training system as a supplement to the traditional face-to-face workshop training. The approach is being implemented by UNEP.

The online training system consists of a long-distance e-learning system that is based on web and multimedia information technology including animation, videos and audio materials. This one-of-a-kind project was designed with a general training module that would target general local officials other than customs officers, and another module targeting customs officers specifically. It also includes a database of policies and regulations related to ozone-layer protection.

The integrated national online training programme has been operative since it was launched at the 2005 International Ozone Day Celebration. About 2,000 local officials from 12 provinces and cities in China have been trained using the system since then. The online system has also helped trainees who received face-to-face training, enabling them to upgrade their knowledge using the online system.

The online system has proven to be a very useful and effective method and tool for local officials to acquire knowledge concerning ozone-depleting substances, which is essential for China to
implement its accelerated phase-out plan and maintain compliance after 2010. The online training system delivers training in a more cost-effective way and has become a valuable approach for complementing, communicating and updating information from face-to-face training. SEPA and UNEP have reached agreement with the local information technology company which developed the software to enable it to be used by other countries, and translation into English is ongoing. An extension of the system to provide training on other multilateral environmental agreements is also under consideration. In all, the system has proven to be a unique, innovative approach to promoting capacity-building for local officials and customs officers on environmental issues.


Bilateral dialogue between Mongolia and China. Bilateral implementing agency: Japan/UNEP
Bilateral dialogue between Mongolia and China. Bilateral implementing agency: Japan/UNEP

Early on in Mongolia’s participation in the Montreal Protocol, there was an appreciation of the significant risk of illegal trade in ODS resulting from Mongolia’s geographical location and the circumstances surrounding the expected shortage of CFCs in all countries. In addition, it was understood that border controls over ODS movement between China and Mongolia were important from the viewpoint of preventing illegal ODS movement by way of Mongolia to third countries.

As an innovative attempt to address this issue, Japan and UNEP facilitated a bilateral dialogue between Mongolia and China. This initiative was made possible with the exceptional collaboration of the Chinese National Ozone Unit and the State Environmental Protection Administration of China (SEPA), which committed themselves strongly to preventing illegal trade in ODS. This was done at a time when many Article 5 countries had started to voice concerns about illegal trade in ODS but could not find effective actions to take other than demanding
exporting countries to take action, which was difficult in to the light of the requirements of World Trade Organization rules. The Mongolia-China dialogue was one of the first examples to start to tackle this problem on a bilateral basis through the voluntary exchange of information between the parties concerned. This dialogue has been continuing as part of the terminal phase-out programme for Mongolia, and similar dialogues has now been undertaken in other difficult areas. The total cost paid by the Fund for the project was $38,307.


ECOFRIG, HIDECOR and NCCoPP Projects in India. Implementing entities: Germany (GTZ Proklima), Switzerland (SDC, INFRAS), UNDP, UNEP, UNIDO
ECOFRIG, HIDECOR and NCCoPP Projects in India. Implementing entities: Germany (GTZ Proklima), Switzerland (SDC, INFRAS), UNDP, UNEP, UNIDO

ECOFRIG, HIDECOR and NCCoPP are three consecutive and interdependent projects in the Indian refrigeration and air conditioning sector which demonstrate how the goals of bilateral development assistance combined with bilateral contributions under the Montreal Protocol can effectively strengthen multilateral processes.

ECOFRIG started in 1992 within the framework of Indo-German-Swiss cooperation. The objective of the project was to establish a level playing field for environmentally friendly, “natural” refrigerants in the refrigeration and air conditioning sector. Natural refrigerants such as hydrocarbons do not deplete the ozone layer and have a very low global warming potential compared to hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), whose use was prevalent at that time.

In the late 1990’s it became clear that refrigeration servicing enterprises generally would not be able to adapt on their own and in time to the new and more demanding non-CFC technologies
being chosen by the major producers. At stake was nothing less than the survival of and employment in many small and informal enterprises in an important industrial subsector. Without
well-functioning refrigeration servicing enterprises, the servicing of old and new equipment would be compromised. Enhancing the skills of over 39,000 such enterprises employing over 77,000 technicians was therefore recognized as an important aspect in support of the achievement of the Government’s national CFC phase-out targets.

At that time, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) focused on refrigeration servicing enterprises from a development policy and environmental protection perspective. As a result, the HIDECOR project was developed by SDC, at first in a pilot phase under the umbrella of ECOFRIG and later as a separate project under Indo-Swiss bilateral cooperation. The
methodologies and infrastructure created under HIDECOR also formed the basis for the formulation of a national strategy for phasing out CFCs focusing on refrigeration servicing
enterprises. This was approved by the Multilateral Fund as the National CFC Consumption Phase-out Plan (NCCoPP). The sequence from ECOFRIG to HIDECOR to NCCoPP is a
remarkable success story of technology transfer and skill development as an integration of bilateral development assistance into multilateral environmental agreements.

As an added benefit, cross-cutting issues between the Montreal Protocol and the Kyoto Protocol could be addressed. Bilateral cooperation is capable of assisting partner countries with the task of integrating actions to enforce and comply with multilateral environmental agreements through support for specific ozone-, climate- and generally environmentally friendly technology options. This positive experience may also be relevant for developing future HCFC phase-out policies which have yet to be formulated for Montreal Protocol Article 5 countries.

Specific Intervention:
In Phase I of ECOFRIG (1994–1996), the main focus was on the use of a hydrocarbon (cyclopentane) as a foam blowing agent, while Phase II (1997–2001) brought hydrocarbon refrigerants (in particular a 50:50 blend of propane and isobutane) into production and also into the servicing of domestic and small commercial refrigeration appliances.

Under HIDECOR, a unique and innovative institutional set-up was developed to provide high-quality training in a very cost-effective manner to a large number of technicians who were geographically widely distributed over various regions of the country. Industry partners were involved from the outset, providing training to technicians from small and low-income service enterprises in the informal sector, alongside their own service technicians. The dissemination and outreach strategy of HIDECOR was based on the principle of technology neutrality: equal weight was given to best practices developed for HFC134a-, hydrocarbon- and CFC-12-based technologies. The project also established close cooperation with the Industrial Training Institute (ITI) system, which revised its training syllabus to include non-CFC refrigerants, emission control measures and retrofitting of CFC appliances. In addition, teaching aids for ITI instructors were developed and 456 ITI instructors received training. NCCoPP was modelled on the HIDECOR project and particular emphasis has been placed on retrofitting CFC-based equipment. A crucial part of the implementation of NCCoPP is the provision of cost-effective and adequate equipment to enable refrigeration service enterprises to adopt in their daily routines the best practices taught in the training courses.

To date, most large manufacturers of domestic appliances in India have opted for the hydrocarbon-based foam blowing technology which was introduced under ECOFRIG, and one of India’s major refrigerator manufacturers converted its entire refrigerator manufacturing line to hydrocarbon-blend technology during the project (supported by Multilateral Fund funding through the World Bank). The training infrastructure created by HIDECOR has been completely integrated into the NCCoPP strategy, and focuses on the important role of CFC- and non-CFC based best servicing practices. While HIDECOR was geographically restricted to selected states in the south of India, NCCoPP provides similar services for the entire country and all remaining refrigeration servicing enterprises, regardless of size, turnover or linkage to industries. NCCoPP will lead to a complete phase-out of CFC consumption in the refrigeration and air conditioning sector in India.

 
Montreal Protocol Public Awareness Awards
For outstanding work in raising awareness about ozone depletion and the global effort to address it.

Air India
 
Air India has used its relationship with flyers to distribute information on ozone layer protection. Their assistance has included the screening of the “Ozzy Ozone” cartoon on their
flights, reproduction and distribution of an “Ozzy Ozone” colouring book, and discussion of the issue of ozone protection in their in-flight magazine.

Bank of Maharashtra  
Bank of Maharashtra in India has made hundreds of thousands of clients aware of the need to protect the ozone layer through its innovative ozone day promotions that include distribution of Ozzy Ozone” material and information on steps that people can take to protect the ozone layer, and placement of advertisements with ozone protection messages.

Beijing Organizing Committee for the Olympics  
Beijing Organizing Committee for the Olympics has demonstrated a high level of commitment to using the preparations for the Olympic Games in 2008 to promote ozone layer protection and the use of ozone friendly equipment.

 

Images from the awards ceremony
Click on image to see larger version
OzonAction Programme
Ms. Sylvie Lemmet receiving an award for the OzonAction Branch
Ms. Sylvie Lemmet receiving an award for the UNEP DTIE OzonAction Programme
Outstanding contributors awards
Mr. Rajendra Shende receiving his Outstanding Contributor award
Mr. Rajendra Shende receiving his Outstanding Contributor award
Staff awards
Ms. Artie Dubrie receiving her staff award

Anne Fenner receiving her staff award

Ms. Artie Dubrie receiving her staff award
Anne Fenner receiving her staff award
Mr. Jeremy Boubie Bazye receiving his staff award.
Ms. Mugure Kibe Ursulet receiving her staff award
Mr. Jeremy Boubie Bazye receiving his staff award
Ms. Mugure Kibe Ursulet receiving her staff award
Ms. Samira de Gobert receiving her staff award.
Mr. Rajendra Shende receiving his staff award
Ms. Samira de Gobert receiving her staff award.
Mr. Rajendra Shende receiving his staff award
Awards for partners
Mr. Xiaoxuan Yu receiving a public awareness award for the Beijing Olympic Committee
Mr. Xiaoxuan Yu receiving a public awareness award for the Beijing Olympic Committee
From left to right: Mr. Rajendra Shende, OzonAction Branch, Mr. Marco Gonzalez, Ozone Secretariat, Ms. Magda Bauta, OPCW, Mr. Angelo Merola, WCO, and Mr. Charles Gbedemah, CBD reveiving an award for green customs initiative
Mr. Vishwapati Trivedi, Joint Managing Director receiving an award for Air India
Ms. Vita Apte receiving a public awareness award for the Bank of Maharashtra
Mr. Vishwapati Trivedi, Joint Managing Director receiving an award for Air India
Ms. Vita Apte receiving a public awareness award for the Bank of Maharashtra
Regional Ozone Quiz winners
 
Regional Ozone Quiz winners: Mr. Lawrence B. Medina, Mr. Paulo Miguel G. Manzanilla, their coach, Ms. Cynthia Andaya, with Prof. Mario J. Molina at the Ozone Day Seminar