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2007


21 December 2007
 
In this issue:
1- Montreal Protocol's Success Offers Lessons for Climate Change
2- Answer to Hot Air Was in Fact a Chilling Blunder
3- Judge Reverses Methyl Bromide Timeline Ruling Requires Phaseout Plan by Jan. 26
4- FPRDI Lumber Kiln Helps Control Global Spread of Pests
5- More Efforts to Protect Grain Crop
6- Belarusian Explorers Leave for Antarctica


Special Announcement

U.S. EPA Climate and Stratospheric Ozone Award 2008 Nominations
Click here to learn more / submit a nomination.
Due No Later than 31 December 2007
GLOBAL
1- Montreal Protocol's Success Offers Lessons for Climate Change

Parties Continue Commitment To Maximize Ozone Regime's Climate Benefits
BALI, INDONESIA - The United States, Argentina, Mauritius, and Micronesia announced at the United Nations climate conference in Indonesia that they will continue to work together to maximize the climate benefits of the world's ozone treaty, the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment Daniel Reifsnyder, from the U.S. State Department, said that the United States was interested in finding ways to reduce emissions of "banks" of ozone-depleting chemicals currently contained in refrigerators and air conditioners that otherwise will be emitted into the atmosphere at equipment end-of-life. He emphasized that Stephen Johnson, Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, wanted to work with other Parties to address banks, and capture the dual ozone and climate benefits.

"… [W]e challenge all delegations to consider ways of destroying the banks of ozone-depleting substances currently installed in equipment," Johnson said in his statement at the 20th Anniversary Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, in September 2007 in Montreal. "These large sources of CFCs and other ozone-depleting substances represent a ripe opportunity to both further protect the ozone layer and to reduce emissions that contribute to global climate change."

Minister of Environment from Argentina, Romina Picolotti, said that, "Argentina agrees that we should continue the successful cooperation with the Parties to the Montreal Protocol. The cooperation under the ozone treaty is an example of developed and developing countries working together to implement solutions to a global environmental problem. In terms of the banks of old CFCs and HCFCs, they are damaging to the climate as well as the ozone layer. We have it in our means to solve this problem, and we should move quickly to do so."

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are among the most commonly used coolants in refrigerators and air conditioners. As ozone-depleting chemicals, they are being phased out under the Montreal Protocol. CFCs and HCFCs also are potent greenhouse gases, thousands of times more powerful than carbon dioxide at warming the planet. Over the next several decades, CFC and HCFC emissions from refrigerators and air conditioners will make a significant contribution to climate change, and damage the ozone layer as well.

"Already, scientists tell us that the Montreal Protocol's phase-out of CFCs will reduce emissions by the equivalent of 135 billion tons of carbon dioxide between 1990 and 2010," said Marco Gonzalez, Executive Secretary of the Ozone Secretariat. "Scientists also tell us that the historic agreement in September to accelerate the phase-out of HCFCs will reduce emissions by an additional 12-15 billion tons over the next several decades, provided that HCFCs are replaced with climate-friendly substitute chemicals and more energy efficient technologies."

Recovering and destroying the banks of CFCs and HCFCs currently contained in refrigerators and air conditioners could avoid at least a portion of the expected 7.4 billion tons of carbon dioxide-equivalent in emissions between 2002 and 2015, with the possibility of even greater emissions beyond 2015, according to estimates by the Montreal Protocol's Technology and Economic Assessment Panel. By comparison, the Kyoto Protocol mandates a reduction of 5 billion tons below 1990 emissions from 2008 to 2012, assuming full compliance from industrialized countries. (Kyoto's reductions will be 10 billion tons, once the 5 billion tons of growth above 1990 levels is added in.)

"Scientists are warning us that the 'tipping point' for abrupt and irreversible changes to the climate, including catastrophic rises in sea level, could be 10 years away," said Ana Maria Kleymeyer, representing Argentina's Ministry of Environment. "We'll get immediate climate and ozone benefits from accelerating the phase-out of HCFCs. We can get additional and immediate ozone and climate benefits from eliminating emissions from banks, including a further delay before the world reaches this tipping point."

The opportunity to reduce emissions almost immediately has drawn interest from many of the climate parties, including many of the world's most vulnerable states.

"Island states are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, and we want to strongly support further efforts to strengthen the Montreal Protocol to capture additional climate benefits," said Ambassador Masao Nakayama of the Federated States of Micronesia. "Preventing climate emissions from banks is another piece of low hanging fruit we can pick that will provide immediate mitigation and help us avoid abrupt changes to the climate."

Eliminating CFC and HCFC banks also will prevent destruction of the ozone layer, which shields the earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation that can cause skin cancer and cataracts, a weakened immune system, and damaged ecosystems and agricultural productivity.

"Creating greater incentives for the recovery and destruction of banks will help the climate, and, importantly, it also will ensure the continued success of the Montreal Protocol in fulfilling its mission to protect the ozone layer," said Sateeaved Seebaluck, Permanent Secretary of the Mauritius Environment Ministry.

"The Montreal Protocol is the world's best environmental treaty, and the world's best climate treaty, so far," said Durwood Zaelke, IGSD President.

The IGSD event on the lessons of the Montreal Protocol for climate mitigation was co-sponsored by Argentina, Mauritius, Micronesia, Sweden, and the United States, as well as by the United Nations Environment Programme's OzonAction Unit and the Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development (IGSD).

"These countries led the way to strengthen the Montreal Protocol and expand its climate mandate at the 20th Anniversary meeting in September, and it's great to see them continue their commitment to the global atmosphere by going after the problem of banks," Zaelke added.

The event featured panelists from the sponsoring Parties, as well as from The Netherlands and the Ozone Secretariat. The event also included a presentation by K. Madhava Sarma, former Executive Secretary of the Ozone Secretariat.
For more information, please contact: Durwood Zaelke, IGSD President, zaelke@igsd.org


2- Answer to Hot Air Was in Fact a Chilling Blunder
Source: The Sydney Monitoring Herald,18 December 2007 By: Ben Cubby Environment Reporter, http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2007/12/17/1197740183601.html?from=top5


NORTH AMERICA
3- Judge Reverses Methyl Bromide Timeline Ruling Requires Phaseout Plan by Jan. 26
Source: Ventura County Star, 13 December 2007, By Zeke Barlow,
http://www.panna.org/resources/documents/VenturaStar20071213.pdf

SOUTH ASIA
4- FPRDI Lumber Kiln Helps Control Global Spread of Pests

Source: Philippine Information Agency, 3 December 207, By: Rizalina K. Araral ,
http://www.pia.gov.ph/?m=12&r=&y=&mo=&fi=p071203.htm&no=15

5- More Efforts to Protect Grain Crop
Source: China Daily, 15 December 2007, By Wu Jiao,
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2007-12/15/content_6323395.htm


EUROPE
6- Belarusian Explorers Leave for Antarctica

Source: Naviny, 3 December 2007,
http://naviny.by/rubrics/inter/2007/12/03/ic_news_259_281510/


FEATURED >>>
> VIDEO: Repairing our Ozone Layer
Running time : 9' 44 - Format : Beta/SP/DV Cam - Versions : EN/FR + INT
To request this video, contact: Mostra Communication, Media Relations
Mariachiara Esposito, E-mail: mes@mostra.com
Script available in English:
http://www.tvlink.org/img/grab/files/256_vnr_1189679909606.pdf

Commentaire disponible en français :
http://www.tvlink.org/img/grab/files/256_vnr_1189679948450.pdf

Source: TVLINK EUROPE. Managed by MOSTRA on behalf of the European Commission,
Click here to View the video:
http://www.tvlink.org/viewer.cfm?vidID=256&strID=179

> READING:
- OzonAction Newsletter, 20th Anniversary Special Issue available in all United Nations Official Languages:
a
|c |e |f |r |s

- HCFCsNews a compilation of news and current information related to HCFCs, drawn from diverse sources worldwide http://www.unep.fr/ozonaction/news/hcfcnews.htm

Attenuation of Fluorocarbons Released from Foam Insulation in Landfills
Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 41, No. 22, 2007

> WEBSITE:
- NEW website address for Belize National Ozone Unit: http://www.noubelize.gov.bz

- Vital Ozone Graphics - resource kit for journalists
Vital Ozone Graphics" is designed to be a practical tool for journalists who are interested in developing stories related to ozone depletion and the Montreal Protocol. Besides providing a basic introduction to the subject, this publication is meant to encourage you to seek further information from expert sources and to provide you with ready-made visual images that can be incorporated into your article.
http://www.vitalgraphics.net/ozone/about/index.html


17 December 2007
 
In this issue:
1- The Montreal Protocol and Climate Change: Lessons for Success
2- Greenhouse Villain Could Be a White Knight After All
3- ODS Phase-Out - FG Embarks On Sensitisation Campaign (Nigeria)
4- Public Meeting Scheduled for Ozone-Depleting Substance Ban
5- Establishment of a Fluorocarbons Destruction Facility in Indonesia
6- Meeting Environmental Protection and Recycling Objectives

 

GLOBAL
1- The Montreal Protocol and Climate Change: Lessons for Success

Highlights from the UN Climate Change Conference, 3-14 December 2007, Bali, Indonesia, Wednesday, 5 December 2007

Husamuddin Ahmadzai, Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, highlighted the benefits in carbon dioxide equivalent emission reductions that have already been achieved through the Montreal Protocol (MP). He noted that the September 2007 agreement on the acceleration of the hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) phase-out under the MP could result in reduced emissions of 12-15 billion tons of carbon dioxide equivalent.
Marco Gonzalez, Executive Secretary, Ozone Secretariat, stated that MP parties were conscious of the climate benefits of ozone protection when they signed the MP, as noted in its preamble. He highlighted the flexibility of the MP in contrast to the Kyoto Protocol.
Ana Maria Kleymeyer, Secretariat of Environment and Sustainable Development, Argentina, stressed that the same government representatives should work on both climate and ozone issues. She listed lessons learned from the MP, including that building trust between parties and synergies between environmental treaties are essential.
Sateeaved Seebaluck, Ministry of Environment, Mauritius, explained that his country's support of the accelerated phase-out of HCFCs under the MP was based on its understanding of the importance of the simultaneous ozone and climate benefits. He cited reasons for which the MP's Multilateral Fund (MLF) is more effective than the Kyoto Protocol's funding mechanisms.
Maas Goote, Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment, the Netherlands, in his own capacity, listed seven features that have facilitated the MP's success, including: long-term objectives for phase-outs; a focus on alternatives for phased-out substances; the adjustment procedure; and a fair and balanced compliance regime.
Daniel Reifsnyder, US State Department, highlighted the potential to reap more climate benefits from the MP if parties agree to destroy banks of ozone-depleting substances. He outlined similarities between the MP and the Kyoto Protocol, but suggested that it would be difficult to develop an adjustment procedure under the latter.
Madhava Sarma, Executive Secretary of the Ozone Secretariat from 1991-2000, argued that the Kyoto Protocol should have time-bound control measures and adjustments and trade controls with non-parties. He recommended restructuring financing for the Kyoto Protocol based on the MLF model, and developing sector-wise technical committees.
Participants discussed why a global phase-out of hydrofluorocarbons is not underway and the need to improve energy efficiency alongside phase-outs.
Source: ENB-IISD Issue #2, UN Climate Change Conference, 3-14 December 2007, Bali, Indonesia, Wednesday, 5 December 2007 http://www.iisd.ca/climate/cop13/enbots/pdf/enbots1231e.pdf

2- Greenhouse Villain Could Be a White Knight After All
Source: NY TIMES, Greentech, 2 December 2007, By Kevin Cameron, http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/02/automobiles/02COOL.html?ref=automobiles


AFRICA
3- ODS Phase-Out - FG Embarks On Sensitisation Campaign
(Nigeria)
Source: AllAfrica Global Media. (allafrica.com), Quoting: The Daily Trust (Nigeria), By: Nasidi Adamu Yahaya, 10 December 2007, http://allafrica.com/stories/200712101389.html

NORTH AMERICA
4- Public Meeting Scheduled for Ozone-Depleting Substance Ban
For More information http://www.fda.gov/OHRMS/DOCKETS/98fr/07n-0262-nec0001.pdf
Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Nov. 14, 2007 | Vol. 4 No. 224,
http://fdanews.com/newsletter/article?issueId=10994&articleId=101023

SOUTH ASIA
5- Establishment of a Fluorocarbons Destruction Facility in Indonesia

Source: Ministry of the Environment Government of Japan, 19 November 2007,

http://www.env.go.jp/en/headline/headline.php?serial=618


EUROPE
6- Meeting Environmental Protection and Recycling Objectives
Source: fona - Forschung für Nachhaltigkeit,

http://www.fona.de/eng/4_services/news/index.php?we_objectID=5827&n=071210_
Meeting_Environmental_Protection


------------

FEATURED READING >>>
Handbook on Critical Use Nominations for Methyl bromide (December 2007)


FEATURED WEBSITE >>> Vital Ozone Graphics - Resource kit for journalists
Vital Ozone Graphics" is designed to be a practical tool for journalists interested in developing stories related to ozone depletion and the Montreal Protocol. Besides providing a basic introduction to the subject, this publication is meant to encourage you to seek further information from expert sources and to provide you with ready-made visual images that can be incorporated into your article. http://www.vitalgraphics.net/ozone/about/index.html


30 November 2007

In this issue:
1- The Environmental Investigation Agency Names New Executive Director
2- U.S. EPA Settles with JWS Refrigeration for $53,481 for Illegal Importation of ODS
3- New Wind Radar Helps Forecasters
4- ASEM to Strengthen Crackdown on Hazardous Waste Transport
5- Panel Manufacturers Hit Back at Recycling Claims
6- Europe Must do More to Cut E-Waste, Report Finds

Special Announcement/
U.S. EPA Climate and Stratospheric Ozone Award 2008 Nominations
To Submit a nomination >>> http://www.epa.gov/ozone/awards/winners.html
Due No Later than 31 December 2007
Contact: Dave Godwin, godwin.dave@epa.gov
Learn more
>>>

GLOBAL
1- The Environmental Investigation Agency Names New Executive Director
Learn more about EIA >>> http://www.eia-global.org/
Source: Earth Times, 21 November 2007,
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/news_press_release,228595.shtml

NORTH AMERICA
2- U.S. EPA Settles with JWS Refrigeration for $53,481 for Illegal Importation of ODS
HONOLULU - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today fined JWS Refrigeration & Air Conditioning, Ltd., a Tamuning, Guam refrigeration and heating equipment services company, $53,481 for allegedly importing banned refrigerants in violation of the Clean Air Act.The company allegedly imported 25,402 kg of hydrochlorofluorocarbon 22, an ozone-depleting substance, from sources outside the United States, a violation of the stratospheric ozone protection regulations."To protect stratospheric ozone, the Clean Air Act limits the importing of ozone depleting chemicals into the United States," said Deborah Jordan, director of the EPA's Air Division for the Pacific Southwest region. "Companies in Guam and other U.S. territories are not excluded and must comply with all stratospheric ozone protection regulations."A May 2006 inspection by the Guam EPA, in consultation with the U.S. EPA, identified the violations by JWS Refrigeration.High in the atmosphere, the stratospheric ozone layer is the earth's protective shield against excessive ultraviolet radiation. Overexposure to ultraviolet radiation is responsible for increased risk of skin cancer and cataracts, depressed immune systems, decreased crop output, and the destruction of plankton, a critical link in the oceanic food chain. The U.S. EPA's stratospheric ozone protection program aims to prevent depletion of the ozone layer through the production phase-out and use restriction of refrigerants. Among other restrictions, the program forbids the importation of ozone-depleting substances.
Source: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), News Release, 19 November 2007

3- New Wind Radar Helps Forecasters
Source:
TheStar, 8 November 2007, By: Peter Calamai, Science Writer,
http://www.thestar.com/News/article/274659


SOUTH ASIA
4- ASEM to Strengthen Crackdown on Hazardous Waste Transport
Source: HooversCom, Quoting: Jiji Press Ltd, /The Financial Times Limited, 9 November 2007, http://www.hoovers.com/free/news/detail.xhtml?ArticleID=20071109670.2_a71e000705db6d9c

EUROPE
5- Panel Manufacturers Hit Back at Recycling Claims
Source: ContractJournal (Cj), 14 November 2007, by: James Stagg,

6- Europe Must do More to Cut E-Waste, Report Finds
For more information, please visit:
http://www.unu.edu/
- http://ec.europa.eu/environment/waste/weee/studies_en.htm
Source: CordisNews, 16 Novemeber 2007,

------------
FEATURED READING >>>
- Primer for members of the Implementation Committee under the Non-compliance Procedure
of the Montreal Protocol
- Revised
This primer is intended to provide members of the Implementation Committee, particularly new members, with a comprehensive understanding of the non-compliance procedure of the Montreal Protocol and the manner in which the Committee has operated over more than 15 years. In that regard, it is important to note that the non-compliance procedure adopted by the Parties consists of only 16 paragraphs and that, like any
institution, the Implementation Committee has developed over the course of its existence a mode of efficient operation that, while firmly based on the non-compliance procedure, relies to a considerable extent on custom and precedent. For this reason, the primer includes both a recitation of the requirements of the noncompliance procedure and an explanation of the customary practices of the Implementation Committee. In this way, it is hoped that the primer will provide a basis for future advancements in the timely and effective resolution of instances of non-compliance while at the same time ensuring the consistent and transparent treatment of the issues considered by the Committee.

- Report of the 39th Meeting of the Implementation Committee - Reissued to correct formatting errors. (E)

FEATURED WEBSITE >>>
Belize National Ozone Unit Website launched November 2007 >>>
http://jp1.estis.net/sites/nou-belize/

See also: ESTIS for NOUs a template based website builder available online in all United Nations official languages >>> http://www.uneptie.org/Ozonaction/information/estisfornous.htm


15 November 2007

GLOBAL
1- Antarctic Ozone Hole Returns to Near Average Levels
Improvement Noted After Last Year's Record Breaker
Source: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 1 November 2007,
http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2007/20071101_ozone.html

SOUTH ASIA
2- Indonesia to Ban CFCs and Methyl Bromide from 2008
Second Southeast Asian Country to Meet Obligations Ahead of Schedule
Bali/Bangkok, 9 November 2007 - Indonesia will impose a ban on the import of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)
and methyl bromide in January 2008, putting the country two years ahead of the 2010 schedule for phase-out of ozone-depleting substances under the Montreal Protocol. The ban makes Indonesia one of the first few countries in the region to meet its deadline of the CFC phase out ahead of schedule.
Achim Steiner, UN Under-Secretary General and UNEP Executive Director, said: "In a few short weeks nations will gather in Bali, Indonesia for the UN climate convention meeting. Here countries must urgently and earnestly address the need for a post-2012 greenhouse gas emission regime".
"Today's announcement by Indonesia is a further good signal, among many positive signals this year, that governments can move on the climate change challenge. The phase-out of CFCs was agreed in order to protect the ozone layer. But new research has shown that this phase-out has had the double environmental and economic benefit of also helping to combat climate change-CFCs it emerges are also powerful greenhouse gases," he added.
"And there are many other win-wins that can be secured. In September, governments also agreed to an accelerated freeze and phase-out of HCFCs-also controlled under the Montreal Protocol-specifically because of their climate impacts. Perhaps if we use our collective creativities we can pick more low hanging fruit from phasing-out of old, energy inefficient light bulbs to more energy efficient buildings," said Mr Steiner.
"Efforts by countries like Indonesia, not only to comply with agreed upon targets under the treaty, but also to meet them ahead of time, is testimony to their commitment to meet promises made under the Montreal Protocol. Much time, effort and work has gone into meeting these obligations, and Indonesia and other countries in this region, who are continuously working to meet this 2010 deadline, should be applauded for this effort," said Surendra Shrestha, Regional Director, UNEP Asia and the Pacific.
With support provided by the Protocol's Multilateral Fund, Indonesia reduced consumption of CFCs from 9,000 tons in 1996 to 2000 tons in 2005, used mostly by refrigeration, air conditioning, and automotive sectors.
Consumption of methyl bromide, not under quarantine regulations, has dropped from 140 tons in 1994 to 32 tons in 2005. Methyl bromide is used for soil treatment and fumigation.
"We feel confident that the ban will encourage consumers to switch to ozone-friendly alternatives, although the main challenge to effectively banning CFC is illegal trade. At the same time, we also need to look at alternatives for the use of methyl bromide, which is on the rise in this region", said Ms. Masnellyarti Hilman, Deputy Minister for Nature Conservation Enhancement and Environmental Degradation Control, Ministry of Environment, Indonesia. Growth in consumption of methyl bromide in quarantine applications in the region is more than 10% per annum.
To address these issues, Indonesia is hosting a meeting that brings together government officers responsible for the Montreal Protocol from countries that are major producers and consumers of ozone depleting substances (ODS), including exporters, importers, and traders of those chemicals, Multilateral Fund implementing agencies and related organizations in Bali today. The "A Special Dialogue on Actions for
Controlling and Monitoring ODS trade in South Asia/ South East Asia" is being held with the first Regional Enforcement Network (REN) Workshop, implemented with assistance from Government of Sweden, and the Joint Meeting of South East Asia (SEAP) and South Asia (SA) Networks of ODS Officers organized by the UNEP DTIE OzonAction Programme. UNDP is providing technical inputs for this special dialogue.
The Joint Meeting of SEAP and SA Networks of ODS Officers will take place 12-14 November 2007 following the special dialogue hosted by Indonesia and REN Workshop, 8-10 November 2007 in Bali, Indonesia.
Contact: Ms. Satwant Kaur, Regional Information Officer, UNEP ROAP, E-mail: kaur@un.org
Ms. Tri Widayati, Staff to the Deputy for Environmental Conservation Ministry for Environment
E-mail: ozon@menlh.go.id, or tri-widayati@menlh.go.id

EUROPE
3- Forgotten Climate Killers: End-of-Life Fridges are Huge Burden on Germany's Climate Change Footprint
Contact: Jürgen Resch, National Director Deutsche Umwelthilfe e.V. (DUH), E-mail: resch@duh.de
Maria Elander, Deutsche Umwelthilfe e.V., Project manager for recycling-based manufacturing systems, E-mail: elander@duh.de
Source: Deutsche Umwelthilfe e.V. (DUH), 7 November 2007,
http://www.duh.de/uploads/media/DUH_PressRelease_CFCs_english.pdf

4- Eco-friendly Foam from Precision
Source: Precision Refrigeration , 25 October 2007,
http://www.precision-refrigeration.co.uk

------------

FEATURED READING >>>
- Report of the 39th Meeting of the Implementation Committee (E)
- Report of the Nineteenth Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol (A) (C) (E) (F) (R) (S)
- MEAs_Negotiator's_Handbook PDF

FEATURED WEBSITE >>>
Online Access to Research in the Environment (OARE)
Developing Nations Now Accessing Environmental Science Journals and Research Papers Worth $1.5 million - An international effort to assist developing countries access one of the world's largest data bases of top notch environmental science journals has evolved to a new level... Members of the "Online Access to Research in the Environment (OARE) say the initiative is now opening its doors to more than 37 new countries-increasing the number of developing nations, areas or territories involved to 107. Learn more >>>

2007 Annual International Research - Conference on Methyl Bromide Alternatives and Emissions Reductions, October 29-November 1, 2007
Objectives of the Conference:

* Support the gathering of data on potential alternatives to methyl bromide for future evaluation and prioritization.
* Enhance technology transfer processes needed to economically and commercially implement methyl bromide alternatives.
* Enhance scientific information and data exchange regarding current research on methyl bromide alternatives and emissions reduction.
* Have interdisciplinary scientific exchange on methyl bromide alternatives and related issues.
* Develop and distribute conference proceedings as an information source on state-of-the-art methyl bromide alternatives for use by Researchers, Users of Methyl Bromide, Legislators, Government Policy Officials, and all other interested parties.
Read presentations / learn more >>>

 


30 October 2007
 
GLOBAL
1- The 2007 Antarctic Ozone Hole - an update from the World Meteorological Organization

The 2007 Antarctic ozone hole is relatively small, both in terms of ozone hole area (area where the total ozone column is less than 220 Dobson Units) and in amount of destroyed ozone (ozone mass deficit, i.e. the amount of ozone that would have to be added to the ozone hole in order to fill those regions where total ozone is less than 220 Dobson Units up to 220 Dobson Units).
From 1998 until now, only the ozone holes of 2002 and 2004 have been smaller than the 2007 ozone hole. It should be pointed out that this is not a sign of ozone recovery. The small ozone hole of 2007 is related to the mild temperatures of the Antarctic stratosphere during the 2007 winter. The stratosphere still contains more than enough chlorine and bromine to cause complete destruction of ozone in the 14-21 km altitude range. The amount of ozone depleting gases reached a maximum around year 2000 in the Antarctic stratosphere. This amount is now declining slowly at a rate of about 1% per year. One expects that the stratosphere will contain enough chlorine and bromine to cause severe ozone holes for another 1-2 decades. The severity of the ozone hole will, during this time period, to a large extent be determined by the meteorological conditions of the stratosphere during the Antarctic winter. Increasing amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will lead to lower temperatures in the stratosphere and this increases the risk of severe ozone holes during the next couple of decades. But there will always be interannual variability in the meteorological conditions, so one can also experience less severe ozone holes. The figures below show the ozone hole area, the ozone mass deficit, the average temperature over the 60-90°S region and the area where the temperature is low enough for the existence of polar stratospheric clouds.
More information can be found at
http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ozone/index.html

Questions can be directed to Press Officer Paul Garwood at 022 730 8417.
Source: The World Meteorological Organization (WMO), 17 October 2007
http://www.wmo.ch/pages/mediacentre/news/documents/Ozonehole2007.pdf
See also >>> Ozone Bulletin, 17 October 2007
http://www.wmo.ch/pages/prog/arep/documents/ant-bulletin-4-2007-v5.pdf

2- "Greening" of 2008 Beijing Olympic Games Impressive Says UN Environment Programme Report
Beijing/Nairobi, 25 October 2007 - Remaining Concerns include Air Pollution; Offsetting of Greenhouse Gas Emissions; Public Awareness and Need to Boost Public Transport Use
Significant strides are being made to 'green' the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, a report issued today by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) says.
The hosting of the Games is also proving to be a catalyst for accelerating environmental improvements across the city as Beijing strives to balance rapid, often double-digit economic growth with health and environmental protection.
Achim Steiner, UN Under-Secretary-General and UNEP Executive Director, said: "The initial score card on the Beijing Olympics and Paralympics 2008 is positive in terms of the greening of the games".
"The more than $12 billion spent by the Municipal Government and Government of China, appears to have been well spent-and will be even more well spent if the lessons learnt and measures adopted are picked up by municipalities across the country so as to leave a real and lasting nationwide legacy," he added.
The report says environmental measures are being introduced covering waste management, cleaner transport systems and water treatment, as well as new urban green belts including a 580-hectare Olympic Forest Park.
The Beijing Organizing Committee for the Olympic Games (BOCOG) should also be commended for accelerating the phase-out of ozone depleting chemicals and for the provision of energy efficiency and green energy appliances at buildings and sports venues.
The report says: "An interesting innovation is the widespread use in the venues of ground, water or air source heat pumps systems to provide buildings with heat in winter and air conditioning in summertime".
Solar power is also being extensively deployed at stadia and at the Olympic village and the organizers have well-developed plans to re-use and recycle venues after the games close.
But while the report acknowledges the significant investment and achievements of the organizers of the 2008 Olympic Games, it also highlights some remaining concerns and missed opportunities that there may still be time to rectify.
Some of these are specific to the Games themselves, while others are linked to challenges facing the city of Beijing generally as it attempts to reduce pollution and steer its development onto a more sustainable path…
Source: UNEP Press Release, 25 October 2007,
http://unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=519&ArticleID=5687&l=en


NORTH AMERICA
3- Environmental Benefits of the New, Stronger HCFC Phaseout Agreement
The agreement to adjust the phase-out schedule for HCFCs is expected to reduce emissions of HCFCs to the atmosphere by 47 percent, compared to the prior commitments under the treaty over the 30-year period of 2010 to 2040. For the developing countries, the agreement means there will be about a 58 percent reduction in HCFCs emission over the 30 year period.
View a graph showing the HCFC reductions in developing countries, reflecting the agreement at the 19th Meeting in Montreal.
The climate benefits of the stronger HCFC agreement will depend on technology choices of the transition from HCFCs during the 30 year time frame of the HCFC phase out. The estimated climate benefit of the new, stronger HCFC phase out may be as much as 9,000 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO 2-eq), or the equivalent of removing the climate emissions from 70 million U.S. passenger cars each year, for the next 30 years. This means the new, stronger HCFC agreement is equivalent to eliminating the climate emissions from 50 percent of all U.S. passenger cars each year, for the next 30 years.
Another way of explaining the climate benefit of the new, stronger HCFC phaseout agreement is to say it is equivalent to eliminating the climate emissions from the electricity needed by 40 million U.S. households each year, for the next 30 years, which would be eliminating the climate emissions from the electricity needed by 40 percent of U.S. households each year, for the next 30 years.
Read analyses of climate benefits of the overall HCFC agreement at the 19th Meeting in Montreal http://www.epa.gov/ozone/intpol/mpagreeanalysis.html
Read analyses of ozone and climate benefits of the U.S. proposal (PDF) (43 pp, 262K, About PDF).
Read Comparison of the Montreal Protocol and United States Phaseout Schedules
http://www.epa.gov/ozone/title6/phaseout/hcfc.html


4- Sears Joins EPA to Help Protect the Planet - One Old Ice Box at a Time

For more information about the RAD program:
h
ttp://www.epa.gov/ozone/partnerships/rad/index.html
To become a partner:
http://www.epa.gov/ozone/partnerships/rad/radpartners.html

Source: US EPA, Press Release, 18 October 2007,
http://yosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.nsf/7ebdf4d0b217978b852573590040443a/
c0a2f3e9090d23b18525737800641d8b!OpenDocument


WEST ASIA
5- Water Chillers Cool off Pearl Island
Source: Hoovers.Com, Quoting: Johnson Controls - Building Design and Construction, 23 October 2007
http://hoovers.com/free/news/detail.xhtml?ArticleID=200710013020.3_5f3a00010579575b

EUROPE
6- Konvekta CO2 Bus Air Conditioning
Source: R744 com, 24 October 2007,

http://www.r744.com/news/news_ida218.php

------------

FEATURED READING >>>
- 2007 Montreal Adjustment on Production and Consumption of HCFCs
-
Primer for members of the Implementation Committee under the Non-
compliance Procedure of the Montreal Protocol - Revised

- Advance Copy of the Report of the Nineteenth Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal
Protocol (E)

GEO-4 The Global Environment Outlook Report produced and published by the Division of Early Warning and Assessment of the United Nations Environment Programme

The Global Environment Outlook Report produced and published by the Division of Early Warning and Assessment of the United Nations Environment Programme.
See >>> Section B - State and Trends of the Environment: 1987-2007 (pg. 36-48)

GEO-4 is available from : http://www.unep.org/geo/geo4/media/


FEATURED WEBSITE >>>WMO Arctic Ozone Bulletins

 

 

 

 

- The World Meteorological Organization (WMO), Ozone web page.
- WMO Arctic Ozone Bulletins
The Secretariat of the World Meteorological Organization, in collaboration with the European Ozone Reserarch Coordinating Unit, issues annual bulletins containing information on the development of the Arctic ozone layer over the course of each winter. The bulletins are based on data provided by WMO Members that operate atmospheric monitoring stations in the Arctic and satellites to observe ozone and related parameters globally.

 


15 October 2007

GLOBAL
1- Gerhard Ertl, Germany, Wins the 2007 Chemistry Nobel Prize
Source: The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Press Release, 10 October 2007
http://www.kva.se/KVA_Root/eng/_press/detail.asp?NewsId=985

2- "Ozone Depletion: From its Discovery to Envisat and Aura" Scientific Symposium:
At the invitation of UNEP, WMO, EESC, IO3C, the Academy of Athens, the Biomedical Research Foundation, Academy of Athens, and the National Observatory of Athens, a core group of speakers who have played an important role in the success of the Montreal Protocol to a scientific symposium in Athens on 26 September 2007. Participants presented state of the art scientific results and discussed the success of the Montreal Protocol implementation. In an "Athens Statement," participants highlighted the "Impact of Climate Change - Ozone Climate Interactions" and "Implications for Policy Formulation," including their finding that it is "imperative to develop similar cooperative relationships between scientific, industrial and environmental organizations and policy makers to develop effective approaches to environmental threats in the 'anthroposcene' era."
ATHENS STATEMENT
September 26, 2007, 11.00 a.m.
On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Montreal Protocol for the protection of the ozone layer, scientists gathered at the Academy of Athens today, September 26, 2007. They noted that the success of the Montreal Protocol is largely based on scientific progress made over the last decades. A world of extreme high chlorine, low ozone, and high UV has presently been avoided. Continued adherence to the Montreal Protocol will assure that this remains the case in the future.
It is perhaps one of the most illustrious examples of a successful global collaboration between scientific, industrial and environmental organizations and policy makers. Control of ozone depleting substances as imposed by the Montreal Protocol is not the only factor that influences the variability of ozone and of harmful solar UV radiation. Aerosols, volcanic eruptions and climate change also influence the expected recovery of the ozone layer from the effects of halocarbons.
In areas like Greece where climate change may lead to significant reduction in precipitation and more frequent heat waves with more intense urban ozone and aerosol pollution events, new scientific and policy challenges will have to be faced.
Impact of Climate Change - Ozone climate Interactions
- The decrease in ozone-depleting substances is a dominant factor in the expected return of ozone levels to pre-1980 values. However changes in climate will influence if, when, and to what extent ozone will return to pre-1980 values in different regions.
- Future increases of greenhouse gas concentrations will contribute to the average cooling in the stratosphere. Chemical reaction rates in the atmosphere are dependent on temperature, and thus the concentration of ozone is sensitive to climate changes. Stratospheric cooling was observed during the past two decades. Further changes to the temperature and circulation of the stratosphere could affect climate and weather in the troposphere.
Implications for Policy Formulation
- The Montreal Protocol is working: There is clear evidence of a decrease in the atmospheric burden of ozone-depleting substances and some early signs of stratospheric ozone recovery.
- Failure to comply with the Montreal Protocol would delay, or could even prevent, recovery of the ozone layer.
- Understanding the interconnections between ozone depletion and climate change is crucial for projections of future ozone abundances.
- Stratospheric and tropospheric ozone are critical components of the global climate system. Understanding this system requires continuation and strengthening of observation systems for ozone and other relevant species, both from ground and space. These observations will provide indispensable information about the phase-out of halocarbons as required by the Montreal Protocol and about the evolution of the atmosphere under climate change. Continuous efforts in laboratory studies and model developments are also needed.
- It is imperative to develop similar cooperative relationships between scientific, industrial and environmental organizations and policy makers to develop effective approaches to environmental threats in the "anthroposcene" era.
Prof. S. Rowland (Nobel Prize / Univ. of California, USA)
Prof. G. Brasseur (Assoc. Director NCAR, USA)
Prof. R. Bojkov (Previous WMO, Univ. of Dresden)
Prof. M.-L. Chanin (CNRS, France)
Dr. J. Farman (Ozone Secretariat, UK)
Dr. S. Godin-Beekmann (Vice President, IO3C / CNRS, France)
M. Gonzalez (Executive Secretary, UNEP Ozone Secretariat)
Prof. I. Isaksen (President, IO3C / Univ. of Oslo, Norway)
Prof. I. Karol (Voeikov Main Geophysical Observ., Russia)
Prof. M. Kurylo (NASA, USA)
Dr. M. McFarland (DuPont Fluoroproducts, USA)
Prof. J. Pyle (Univ. of Cambridge, UK)
Prof. R. Stolarski (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA)
Prof. C. Zerefos (President of NOA, Secretary IO3C)
Download/Read the Statement
Contact: Prof. Christos Zerefos, Secretary of IO3C, President, National Observatory of Athens,
zerefos@geol.uoa.gr
Source: http://www.20yearsmontrealprotocol.org/comitee.php

AFRICA
3- Nigeria FG Plans to Phaseout Ozone Depleting Related Substances by 2010
Source: The Daily Trust, Abuja, 4 October 2007,
http://dailytrust.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=747&Itemid=42

4- North West - Protection of Ozone Layer Pre-occupies
Source: AllAfrica, Quoting:Cameroon Tribune, 27 September 2007, By Yaoboa Ndula Bamenda (Mezam) http://allafrica.com/stories/200709270669.html

LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN
5- Protocolo de Montreal Concluyo Acuero Historico En Su Vigesimo Aniversario
Luego de cinco días intensos de negociaciones, bajo el liderazgo de la Secretaría para la Protección de la Capa de Ozono del Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA), más de 191 países reunidos en el Palacio de Congresos de Montreal se comprometieron a eliminar la utilización de los HCFCs (Hidroclorofluorocarbonos), poderoso gas de efecto invernadero,
10 años antes de lo previsto.
El acuerdo permitirá que el agujero de la capa de ozono se recupere más rápidamente, asimismo, se reducirá en un 3.5% la producción de este gas a efecto invernadero en el planeta según las evaluaciones del PNUMA. Los países en desarrollo deberán abandonar la utilización del HCFC en el año 2030 en lugar del 2040, fecha fiada luego de la firma del Protocolo en 1987. Por su parte los países industrializados deberán prohibir este producto en el 2020 en lugar de 2030.
Como se sabe el HCFC es un producto utilizado para reemplazar los CFCs usados en la fabricación de refrigeradores, espumas sintéticas y aires acondicionados. Esta sustancia nociva para la salud humana, la capa de ozono y el clima son utilizados en los países en desarrollo debido a su bajo costo. "Sin este nuevo acuerdo, probablemente se habría duplicado la producción mundial del HCFC de aquí al 2015", declaró el Sr. Achim Steiner, Director Ejecutivo del PNUMA.
Para lograr la eliminación acelerada del HCFC, los países industrializados se comprometieron a desembolsar una importante suma de dinero a los países en desarrollo para facilitar la transición a otras sustancias.
20 años de éxitos del Protocolo de Montreal
El Protocolo de Montreal para la Protección de la Capa de Ozono, es el más exitoso tratado internacional vinculante en materia ambiental. "Los 191 países que ratificaron este tratado han demostrado que se puede cambiar el comportamiento humano a nivel mundial y que al hacerlo han mejorado la condición del medio ambiente", declaró Ad Merkelt, subsecretario del Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo.
Las Naciones Unidas y el Canadá entregaron diversos premios a científicos y organizaciones internacionales por su contribución a la conservación de la capa de ozono. Algunos de los laureados fueron Miguel Quintero, profesor de ingeniería química de la Universidad de los Andes; Marta Pizano, consultora en temas ambientales y Jorge Enrique Sánchez, en representación del Ministerio de Medio Ambiente, Vivienda y Desarrollo Territorial de Colombia.
Por su lado, el Gobierno del Canadá le otorgó un premio al Fondo Multilateral de Montreal por su gran labor en la implementación del Protocolo de Montreal. Como se recordará, el Fondo Multilateral fue creado en 1990, un Fondo multi-millonario destinado a ayudar a los países en desarrollo para lograr la eliminación de la producción y el uso de sustancias químicas que agotan la capa de ozono. Cerca de 49 países industrializados contribuyeron con alrededor de dos mil doscientos millones de dólares hasta la fecha y cerca de 146 países se han beneficiado de la ayuda financiera de este Fondo.
Foto: ENB
Source: L'Alternativa Latina.com, By Frida Velarde,
http://www.lalternativalatina.com/fvelarde.html

NORTH AMERICA
6- Malden, Mass. Baking Company Pays Fine for Clean Air Violations
Contact: David Deegan, (617) 918-1017 - More Information: Enforcing Clean Air requirements in New England, http://www.epa.gov/region1/enforcement/air
Source: US EPA, 10 October 2007

WEST ASIA
7- Qatar to Curb Ozone Depletion
Source: The Peninsula, 4 October 2007,
http://www.thepeninsulaqatar.com/Display_news.asp?section=Local_News&subsection=
Qatar+News&month=October2007&file=Local_News200710042759.xml

PACIFIC ISLANDS COUNTRIES
8- Cabinet Approves Ozone Survey
Source: The Fiji Times, 11 October 2007, http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=72111

EUROPE
9- Ozone Hole Shrinks
Source: Earthweek: A Diary of the Planet, 11 October 2007 | Moscow News/40 2007,
http://mnweekly.ru/world/20071011/55282509.html

------------

FEATURED READING >>>

The Montreal Protocol -
Ozone Layer and Climate Protection
Cameron May

 

 

OzonAction Newletter -
Special issue to Celebrate
Montreal Protocol's
20th Anniversary
UNEP DTIE OzonAction

 

FEATURED WEBSITE >>> UNEP Environment for Development, Climate Change/Ozone
http://www.unep.org/themes/climatechange/ozone/



Celebrate the Montreal Protocol 20th Anniversary

16 September 2007

International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer

On 19 December 1994, the U.N. General Assembly proclaimed 16 September the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer, commemorating the date, in 1987, on which the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was signed (resolution 49/114). States were invited to devote the
Day to promote, at the national level, activities in accordance with the objectives of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. The ozone layer filters sunlight and prevents the adverse effects of ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface, thereby preserving life on the planet >>>

http://www.unep.fr/ozonaction/events/ozoneday/index.htm

* *** *


Message of the UN Secretary General on the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer
16 September 2007

The battle to repair the ozone layer represents one of the great success stories of international cooperation. Levels of ozone-damaging substances in our atmosphere are falling. And initial signs suggest that the vital shield protecting us from the sun's deadly ultraviolet radiation is regenerating.

When the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was signed twenty years ago, it was far from certain that such a turnaround was possible. At that time, the world spewed out nearly two million tons of ozone-depleting substances annually. These chemicals were used in agriculture and in refrigeration, in pharmaceuticals as well as in furniture manufacture. Their pervasiveness led some to believe that eliminating them was both impractical and unattainable.

Twenty years later, the developed world has nearly phased out these substances. And their use in the developing world has plummeted by over 80 percent. I congratulate all Parties to the Montreal Protocol for this remarkable achievement. Their vision and commitment have translated into real gains.

Our measures against ozone depleting substances have yielded broader benefits as well. Many of these chemicals contribute to global warming. Their dramatic reduction has helped bolster measures to counter climate change.

On the 20th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol, these developments give us reason to celebrate, but not to become complacent. Scientists are warning that the ozone layer will remain particularly vulnerable some time. State Parties must continue to implement the agreement, and ensure that the production of chlorofluorocarbons in developing countries is completely phased out by 2010, the deadline imposed by the Montreal Protocol.

On this International Day, let us reaffirm our commitment to protecting the ozone layer. And let us hope that our successful efforts on this front will inspire sustained and resolute multilateral action on the world's many other environmental problems.
http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?ArticleID=5666&DocumentID=518&l=en

* *** *

Ozone Treaty's Role in Combating Climate Change
Tops Environment Ministers Meeting in Canada
Two Decades of Success and Future Years of Achievement Take Centre Stage at
20th Anniversary Celebrations of Montreal Protocol

Nairobi/Montreal, 14 September 2007 - An accelerated freeze and phase-out of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), chemicals that were used to replace more ozone-damaging substances known as CFCs, is to be considered by governments at an international meeting in Montreal, Canada.

New science and technical assessments indicate that speeding up a freeze and phase-out of HCFCs and their related by-products could not only assist in the recovery of the ozone layer.
An acceleration could also play an important role in addressing another key environmental challenge namely climate change.
A record nine countries-developed and developing- have submitted six different proposals which will be on the table when up to 191 parties or governments meet in the Canadian city between 17 and 21 September. The negotiations will occur during the 20th Anniversary celebration of the world's ozone treaty, the Montreal Protocol.
The Protocol was negotiated in response to growing international concern over the emergence of a hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica from the use of ozone-depleting chemicals in products from hair sprays to fire fighting equipment.
HCFCs, promoted over a decade ago as less damaging replacements for the older CFCs, have now become widespread in products such as refrigeration systems, air conditioning units and foams.
Under the Montreal Protocol, the United Nations ozone layer protection treaty which was adopted in 1987, use of HCFCs is set to cease in developed countries in 2030 and in developing ones in 2040.
However, scientists and many governments are now studying a range of options for a more rapid freeze on consumption and production of these replacements and the bringing forward of the final phase-out by around 10 years.
It follows research indicating that acceleration could, over the coming decades deliver cumulative emission reductions over the equivalent to perhaps 18 to 25 billion metric tonnes of carbon dioxide (18 gigatones-25 gigatonnes) depending on the success of governments in encouraging new ozone and climate-friendly alternatives.
Annually, it could represent a cut equal to over 3.5 per cent of all the world's current greenhouse emissions.
In contrast the Kyoto Protocol, the main greenhouse gas emission reduction treaty, was agreed with the aim of reducing developed country emissions by just over five per cent by 2012.
The final benefits of an accelerated freeze and phase-out of HCFCs may prove to be even higher than the 18 to 25 billion metric tonnes, according to a just-released report from the Montreal Protocol's Technology and Economic Assessment Panel that is designed to inform the negotiations at the international meeting in Canada.
Close to the equivalent of 38 billion tonnes (38 gigatonnes) of carbon dioxide if the acceleration is accompanied by the recovery and destruction of old equipment and insulating foam and improvements in energy efficiency, says the Panel.
For example a faster switch to alternatives to HCFCs may well stimulate technological innovation including a more rapid introduction of energy efficient equipment that in turn will assist in reducing greenhouse gas emissions even further.
The ozone layer and human health too will benefit. Under some of the accelerated phase-out scenarios, ozone levels could return to healthy pre-1980 levels a few years earlier than current scientific predictions.
Benefits would include a reduction in skin cancer, cataracts, and harm to the human immune system alongside reduced damage to agricultural and natural ecosystems.
Achim Steiner, UN Undersecretary General and Executive Director of the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) which is responsible for the Montreal Protocol, said: "The Montreal Protocol is without doubt one of the most successful multilateral treaties ever and I look forward to celebrating, in mid-September, two decades of achievement in the Canadian city where it was born".
"The phase out of CFCs has not only put the ozone layer on the road to recovery. New research, published in March this year by Dutch and American scientists, also shows that the CFC phase-out has assisted in combating climate change. But the treaty's success story is far from over with new and wide ranging chapters still to be written. Indeed if governments adopt accelerated action on HCFCs, we can look forward to not only a faster recovery of the ozone layer, but a further important contribution to the climate change challenge," he said.
Mr Steiner added: "In doing so the treaty will also underline the often overlooked fact that multilateral environment agreements like the Montreal Protocol and the Kyoto Protocol have far wider environmental, social and economic benefits than perhaps are fully recognized when they are initially agreed. In short, treaties working together can do far more, more rapidly and at a lower cost".
The Honourable John Baird, Canada's Environment Minister, said "The original Montreal Protocol stands as a model of the tremendous results that can be achieved when the international community works together to tackle environmental problems. As the proud host country of this meeting, Canada believes that more can be done, and so we support an accelerated phase out of HCFCs. We will work with the countries who have signed the protocol to help make this happen, and we will be pushing the international community to build on the success story that began here 20 years ago."
The meeting comes in advance of a Heads of State event on climate change being hosted by the UN Secretary General, Mr Ban Ki-Moon.
This event, scheduled to take place at UN Headquarters in New York on 24 September, is aimed at building consensus at the highest level on the need for climate action and a global emission reduction agreement to come into force when the Kyoto Protocol expires in five years time.
An accelerated freeze and phase out of HCFCs might offer governments 'quick wins' in addressing climate change and build confidence that a new international regime on greenhouse gas emissions can be agreed before the Kyoto Protocol expires in 2012, UNEP suggests.

Source: UNEP News Release 2007/27
English
http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=517&ArticleID=5665&l=en
French
http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=517&ArticleID=5665&l=fr

* *** *

Combating Climate Change Given Big Confidence Boost in Canada
Governments Agree to Accelerated 'Freeze and Phase-out" of Ozone and Climate-Damaging Chemicals at
Montreal Protocol's 20th Anniversary Celebrations

Montreal/Nairobi, 22 September 2007 - An historic agreement to tackle the twin challenges of protecting the ozone layer and combating climate change has been agreed by governments.
Nations signed up to an accelerated freeze and phase out of substances known as hydrochlorflurocarbons (HCFCs) under the 20 year-old Montreal Protocol- the UNEP treaty established in 1987 to protect the Earth's ozone layer from chemical attack.
The decision, including an agreement that sufficient funding will be made available to achieve the strategy, follows mounting evidence that HCFCs contribute to global warming.
HCFCs emerged as replacement chemicals in the 1990s for in air conditioning, some forms of refrigeration equipment and foams following an earlier decision to phase-out older and more ozone-damaging chemicals known as CFCs or chloroflurocarbons.
Governments meeting in the Canadian city agreed at the close to freeze production of HCFCs in 2013 and bring forward the final phase-out date of these chemicals by ten years.
The acceleration may also assist in restoring the health of the ozone layer?the high flying gas that filters out damaging levels of ultra violet light?by a few years too.
Achim Steiner, UN Under-Secretary General and UNEP Executive Director, praised the decision taken at the 20th anniversary celebrations of the Montreal Protocol calling it an 'important and quick win' for combating climate change.
"Historic is an often over-used word but not in the case of this agreement made in Montreal. Governments had a golden opportunity to deal with the twin challenges of climate change and protecting the ozone layer?and governments took it. The precise and final savings in terms of greenhouse gas emissions could amount to several billions of tonnes illustrating the complementarities of international environmental agreements," he said.
Mr Steiner also congratulated the government of Canada and John Baird, the Canadian Environment Minister, for hosting a successful meeting.
He said the spotlight now moves to New York where, on 24 September, the UN Secretary- General Ban Ki Moon is hosting a Heads of State meeting on climate change.
The meeting will help to build confidence in the run up to the UN climate convention negotiations scheduled in Bali, Indonesia, in December. Here nations need to get down in earnest to negotiate an international greenhouse gas emissions reductions agreement to kick in post-2012.
Mr Steiner said:" I believe the agreement and the spirit of Montreal can build confidence in the United Nations as a platform for negotiating effective agreements for addressing the environmental challenges of our time".
"Montreal underlines that when nations are united they can achieve a great deal and on multiple fronts. It also underlines how international treaties?in this case the UN's Montreal Protocol and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change?can deliver far more when we build on the scientific consensus and mobilize the technological and economic means to act," he added.
John Baird, Canada's Environment Minister, added: "The Montreal Protocol, already considered the most successful environmental agreement to date, delivers once again, to protect the ozone layer as well as the most pressing issue of our time?climate change. Today's announcement demonstrates the kind of concrete action citizens around the world are demanding".
The Agreement on HCFCS
HCFCs, which also damage the ozone layer but less than CFCs, were always planned as interim substitutes and were due to be phased out in 2030 by developed countries and in 2040 by developing ones.
However in recent years and months mounting evidence has emerged on the growth in HCFCs and the potentially significant benefits arising in terms of combating climate change and ozone loss if an accelerated freeze and accelerated phase-out could be achieved.
Experts estimate that without this week's agreement, production and consumption of HCFCs may have doubled by 2015 adding to the dual challenges of ozone depletion and climate change.
Here in Montreal six proposals were put before governments from both developed and developing countries. They represented a variety of options including the freeze dates; reduction steps towards a final and accelerated phase out.
Industry experts had indicated that, should an agreement be taken this week in Montreal, this would send a strong signal resulting in the rapid development of replacement chemicals and technologies.
The final agreement is a combination of the various options proposed by Argentina and Brazil; Norway, Iceland and Switzerland; the United States; Mauritania, Mauritius and the Federated States of Micronesia. Under the agreement, productions of HCFCs are to be frozen at the average production levels in 2009-2010 in 2013.
Developed countries have agreed to reduce production and consumption by 2010 by 75 per cent and by 90 per cent by 2015 with final phase out in 2020.
Developing countries have agreed to cut production and consumption by 10 per cent in 2015; by 35 per cent by 2020 and by 67.5 per cent by 2025 with a final phase-out in 2030.
It was also agreed that a small percentage of the original base line amounting to 2.5 per cent will be allowed in developing countries during the period 2030-2040 for 'servicing' purposes.
Essentially this means that some equipment, coming towards the end of its life such as office block air conditioning units, could continue to run on HCFCs for a few more years if needed.
The 191 Parties to the Montreal Protocol?190 countries plus the European Commission?also made an agreement on financing.
The Protocol's financial arm?the Multilateral Fund? which to date has spent over $2 billion to assist developing country reductions comes up for replenishment next year. The new agreement takes into account the need for 'stable and sufficient' funds and the fact that there may be 'incremental costs' for developing countries under the accelerated HCFC freeze and phase out.
Governments agreed here to commission a short study by experts to fully assess the likely costs of the acceleration. They will report back early in 2008 and inform parties on the suggested sums required for the new replenishment.
Marco Gonzalez, Executive Secretary of UNEP's Ozone Secretariat, said: "The progress achieved over 20 years and continued this week demonstrates to the world that developed and developing countries can work together to meet global challenges. Here this week numerous nations including China, India, the United States and the European Union, demonstrated the art of the possible and solidarity in advancing the international environmental agenda on both ozone and now increasingly on climate change".
Other Important Decisions Taken at the 19th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol
Methyl bromide, a pesticide and ozone depleting substance, was meant to be fully phased-out by developed countries in 2005.
But 'critical use exemptions' have been granted because some farmers producing products such as strawberries and cucumbers to tomatoes and eggplants argue that alternatives are either not ready or cost effective for all circumstances.
In 2005, over 16,000 tonnes of methyl bromide were approved under the Montreal Protocol and in 2007 over 9,100 tonnes were permitted.
Here in Montreal, governments approved just over 4,600 tonnes continuing the downward trend in critical use exemptions for developed countries.
Notes to Editors: 20th Anniversary Montreal Protocol web site
http://www.unep.org/themes/climatechange/ozone/

Contact: Nick Nuttall, UNEP Spokesperson. Before the Montreal meeting Tel: +254 20 7623084, Mobile: +254 733 632755, E-mail: nick.nuttall@unep.org

Environment Canada Media Relations Tel: (819) 934-8008 or 1-888-908-8008

Source: UNEP
http://unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.Print.asp?DocumentID=517&ArticleID=5671&l=en

* *** *

Canada Contributes to Major International Agreement to
Protect the Ozone Layer and Tackle Climate Change

MONTREAL, September 22, 2007- Canada's Environment Minister John Baird, is pleased to announce that countries attending the Montreal Protocol conference have reached a major agreement to speed up the phase-out of chemicals that harm the ozone layer and cause climate change.

"The Montreal Protocol, already considered the most successful environmental agreement to date, will do even more to protect both the ozone layer as well as the most pressing issue of our time - climate change," Minister Baird said. "Today's announcement demonstrates the kind of concrete action citizens around the world are demanding."
At the start of the conference Minister Baird challenged the international community to speed up the phase-out of chemicals that deplete the ozone layer and cause climate change. Under the agreement, 191 countries have agreed to aggressively accelerate the elimination of the last ozone depleting substances of importance, called hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). This will be accomplished by advancing the freeze of HCFCs production and consumption by 3 years in developing countries. That will be followed by the addition of an ambitious series of reductions leading to a phase out 10 years sooner.

Previously, there were no limits imposed prior to the phase-out in developing countries which was scheduled for 2040. In addition, developed countries have agreed to an accelerated schedule for the phase out of production and consumption by 2020.

"What's even more remarkable is we have an agreement on ozone and climate change that includes China, India and the United States," said Minister Baird. "This is encouraging as the world meets next week to fight climate change at the United Nations and in Washington."

"Countries have also reaffirmed their commitment to this significant agreement to protect human health and the environment by adopting the Montreal Declaration," said Minister Baird. "The agreements reached in Montreal this week will hopefully provide an example for upcoming climate change meetings in New York, in Washington and in Bali over the coming weeks and months."

"Historic is an often over-used word but not in the case of this agreement made in Montreal. Governments had a golden opportunity to deal with the twin challenges of climate change and protecting the ozone layer - and governments took it. The precise and final savings in terms of greenhouse gas emissions could amount to several billions of tonnes illustrating the complementarities of international environmental agreements," said Achim Steiner, Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme.

On Monday, September 24, the Prime Minister will participate in a high level event on climate change at the United Nations in New York. Later in the week, Minister Baird will lead Canada's delegation at the Major Economies Initiative in Washington. At both of these events, Canada will continue its leadership role in pushing for a global framework for fighting climate change beyond 2012.
For more information, please visit http://www.ec.gc.ca
Contact: Eric Richer, Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of the Environment (819) 997-1441
Environment Canada - Media Relations (819) 934-8008 or 1-888-908-8008
Source: Environment Canada News Release
http://www.ec.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=714D9AAE-1&news=DB7F1DFA-58DE-4BAC-8A16-B36EF2417EA6

* *** *

Secretary-General Welcomes Historic Agreement to Phaseout Hydrochlorofluorocarbons,
Chemical Compound Damaging to Ozone Layer, Contributor to Climate Change


The following statement was issued today by the Spokesperson for UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon:

The Secretary-General welcomes the agreement reached over the weekend by the signatories of the Montreal Protocol to sign up to an accelerated freeze and phase-out of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), the chemical compound which damages the ozone layer and also contributes to climate change.
The Secretary-General is especially pleased that this historic agreement was reached on the eve of the high-level event on climate change convened by him on the margins of the United Nations General Assembly. He notes that international efforts to protect the ozone layer and to combat climate change are mutually supportive. He also notes that the agreement reached in Montreal includes a commitment to make sufficient funding available to implement the strategy of phasing out HCFCs. The Secretary-General hopes Member States will demonstrate the same urgency and boldness as they turn to the sources of greenhouse gases.

Source: UN Department of Public Information, News and Media Division, New York, 24 September 2007 http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2007/sgsm11177.doc.htm

* *** *

Further Resources >>>
20th Anniversary Montreal Protocol web site

UNEP Special Page on 20th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol

Ozone Secretariat

OzonAction Programme (UNEP)

The Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol

International Ozone Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer 2007
Celebrating 20 Years of Progress in 2007

Technology & Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP)

Achim Steiner, UNEP Executive Director, Podcast
"Environmental Success: 20th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol"

UNEP Executive Director's speech at the 19th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol

Ozone Treaty's Role in Combating Climate Change Tops Environment Ministers Meeting in Canada
UNEP Press Release (14 September 2007)

Daily coverage of the 19th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol
IISD, Canada

 


15-30 August 2007


In this issue:
1- The Ozone Treaty Can Do Much More For the Planet
2- How to Gain A Climate Consensus
3- Triple Benefits: Opportunity in Mobile Air Conditioning
4- Les "Douanes vertes" pour préserver l'environnement en Afrique
5- Q&A: Global Fight to Protect the Ozone Layer Celebrates 20 Years
6- Washington State University Researches Tackle Nature-Friendly Refrigeration
7- CFC Use Continues to Dwindle under Montreal Protocol Guidance
8- Rural Students Fly Out for Ozone Quiz
9- UAE Customs Training on ozone-depleting substances monitoring and control

GLOBAL

1- The Ozone Treaty Can Do Much More For the Planet
By Mario Molina
Source: The Financial Times, August 24 2007,
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/ad5a4ba2-51da-11dc-8779-0000779fd2ac.html

2- How to Gain A Climate Consensus
Source: WahsingtonPost, 4 September 2007, By George P. Shultz
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/09/04/AR2007090401759.html

3-Triple Benefits: Opportunity in Mobile Air Conditioning

Rajendra Shende, Head, OzonAction Branch, UNEP DTIE Paris
Source: IEA Heat Pump Centre, Volume 25, No. 2/2007
http://www.heatpumpcentre.org/publ/HPCOrder/ViewDocument.aspx?RapportId=422


AFRICA

4- Les "Douanes vertes" pour préserver l'environnement en Afrique
Source: Panapress, Dakar, 8 Août 2007
http://www.lemali.fr/afrique/afrique_infos/les_%22douanes_vertes%22_
pour_preserver_l'environnement_en_afrique_200708086406.html


LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN

5- Q&A: Global Fight to Protect the Ozone Layer Celebrates 20 Years
Interview with Montreal Protocol chief Marco González
Source: IPS-Inter Press Service, 11 August 2007,
http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=38863



NORTH AMERICA

6- Washington State University Researches Tackle Nature-Friendly Refrigeration
For more information on ASHRAE and this grant, visit
http://www.ashrae.org/
and http://www.ashrae.org/doclib/20070426_1394RFP.pdf
For more information on Amir Jokar and his ongoing research, visit
http://www.vancouver.wsu.edu/fac/jokar/

Source: Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC., 1 August 2007,
http://www.prweb.com/releases/2007/08/prweb543523.htm

7- CFC Use Continues to Dwindle under Montreal Protocol Guidance
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently published a final rule and a proposed rule relating to allotments of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) to be used in producing inhalers. CFCs, while stable in the troposphere, break down in the stratosphere. Within the stratosphere is a highly concentrated area of ozone known as our ozone layer. CFCs break down the stratospheric ozone layer allowing more ultraviolet-B radiation to reach Earth's surface, causing damage such as increased skin cancer rates and harm to marine ecosystems. In 1978, armed with this knowledge and public support, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published rules banning the use of CFCs as propellants in aerosol containers. Language within the rule exempted certain "essential uses" for CFCs from the ban, including metered-dose inhalers (MDIs). The 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Montreal Protocol), an international agreement to phase out the use of CFCs, has similar language exempting MDIs.
Albuterol, also known as Salbutarnol to the international community, is a drug frequently used in MDIs to treat asthma attacks. In 2005 the FDA published a rule removing the "essential use" designation from Albuterol MDIs, effective December 31, 2008 . At the time, there were two Albuterol MDIs on the market which did not use ozone depleting substances (ODSs), such as CFCs. Based on the FDA's conclusion that the non-ODS MDIs are satisfactory replacements for those Albuterol MDIs using CFCs, it published the rule effectively banning use of CFCs in Albuterol MDIs after December 31, 2008 . In 2006 CFC MDIs made up 60% of Albuterol MDIs. By the end of 2007, fewer than 40% of Albuterol MDIs will be CFC MDIs.
The phase-out of CFCs in Albuterol MDIs, the most popular kind of inhaler that uses CFCs, has a clear effect on the overall requirement for CFCs in total MDIs. On June 12, 2007 , EPA authorized 167 Metric Tons of CFCs to be distributed in 2007 for MDIs, and proposed that a mere 27 metric tons be allotted in 2008. This demonstrates a significant decrease in need for CFCs in MDIs. The precipitous drop in need is caused by a number of factors, namely the phase-out of CFC use in Albuterol MDIs and stockpiling of unused CFCs from previous years' allotments. Though the allotted amount of CFCs may increase in 2009, currently the trend suggests effective cooperation between government agencies and the MDI manufacturing industry to continue producing effective, essential medical products in an environmentally responsible manner.
Albuterol MDIs are certain to be only the first in a series of inhalers to successfully eliminate the need for ODSs. However, non- CFC Albuterol MDIs may be difficult to initially obtain at comparable prices. Albuterol inhalers containing CFCs currently offer relatively inexpensive generic brands. The new CFC free Albuterol MDIs are still under patent, so no inexpensive generic brand is available. In many places the price is as much as $20 higher, which is particularly burdensome to low income asthmatics. Especially since low income communities report higher rates of asthma attributed to poor environmental conditions near their communities. Prices for the non- CFC Albuterol MDIs will drop once generic brands are produced, but that will not occur until 2010 at the earliest. The hope is that healthcare plans will provide a stop-gap between current pricing and the release of more affordable non-ODS generic brands.
Despite the short-term drawbacks, the reduction of CFC usage, even for essential use purposes, will offer long-term health benefits to people and the environment. The ozone layer is currently experiencing depletion at an average of 4.5 percent at mid-latitudes. Considering that the depletion rate would have eventually reached 20 percent or more had treaties like the Montreal Protocol not been enacted, this is a real accomplishment. If current international agreements are adhered to, the ozone layer should recover to pre-1980 levels in the year 2050.
Different government agencies are working under the guidance of international agreements in conjunction with private industries and it is making a difference. These efforts have led to improving public health, improving environmental conditions, and curbing global warming. Now and in the near future, we should be using the Montreal Protocol's success as an example in fostering new agreements with the international community in order to build relations with other countries, attack global problems with global solutions, and curb the potential damages resulting from global climate change.
By Gregory Dutton, Law Clerk, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, US EPA; Law Student, Pace Law School,
gdutton@law.pace.edu

Source: INECE, issue 15, Summer 2007,
http://inece.org/newsletter/15/commentary/cfc.html


SOUTH ASIA

8- Rural Students Fly Out for Ozone Quiz

Contact: Satwant Kaur, UNEP Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
(ROAP) kaur@un.org
Source: Fiji Times : Sunday, August 19, 2007, MERESEINI MARAU,
http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=68799



WEST ASIA

9- UAE Customs Training on ozone-depleting substances monitoring and control
Source: AME Info, United Arab Emirates, Tuesday, 17July 2007
http://www.ameinfo.com/126762.html

FEATURED READING >>>
New Book Celebrates Montreal Protocol
as Beacon for Climate Change
Stephen O. Andersen, K. Madhava Sarma and Kristen N. Taddonio are authors of a new book presenting lessons and insider accounts demonstrating how and why technology transfer works for stratospheric ozone protection. Ultimately, the book provides the only thorough assessment of successful technology transfer of the nature and scale required for combating climate change and other global environmental challenges. Study the details of 1000 investments over 15 years, hear directly from three dozen sector experts, recall your own contributions to the remarkable victory in making the world safer for future generations.
"Technology Transfer for the Ozone Layer: Lessons for Climate Change"
Earthscan, London http://www.earthscan.co.uk

BMW chooses CO2 air conditioning, media reports
(2007-09-05) As the first German carmaker, BMW has confirmed to a leading automotive news source that they will use CO2 (R744) as the refrigerant for its next-generation air conditioning systems. Other German brands are also expected to confirm their choice at next week's Frankfurt auto show. http://www.r744.com/news/news_ida189.php

FEATURED EVENT >>>
Symposium on Global Environment and Fluorocarbons
to be held on October 5th in Tokyo - This year marks the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. In addition, the Law on Recovery and Destruction of Fluorocarbons, which was amended last June, will be enforced beginning on October 1st. In view of these events, the Ministry of the Environment [Japan] will hold a symposium on Global Environment and Fluorocarbons on October 5th in Tokyo.
This symposium consists of lectures and a panel discussion. Dr. [Shirwood] Rowland, a professor of the University of California, the United States of America, who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his analysis of the mechanism of ozone depletion by fluorocarbons, and Mr. Mohri, the president of the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation, who is also a famous astronaut, will give lectures. The lectures will be followed by a panel discussion in which experts on the global environment and fluorocarbons will participate.
English http://www.env.go.jp/en/headline/headline.php?serial=489
Japanese http://www.env.go.jp/press/press.php?serial=8593

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT >>> The 19th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocole scheduled to take place from 17-21 September 2007 in Montreal, Canada. It will be preceded by: the 39th meeting of the Implementation Committee, which will be held 12-15 September 2007; the meeting of the Bureau of the 18th Meeting of the Parties, which will take place on 15 September 2007; and a 20th Anniversary Celebration Seminar on the Montreal Protocol, which will be held on 16 September 2007. Read/Download Related Documents http://ozone.unep.org/highlights.shtml
Contact: Ozone Secretariat; tel: +254-20-762-3850/1; fax: +254-20-762-4691/2/3; e-mail: ozoneinfo@unep.org; internet: http://ozone.unep.org/Events/19mop_advance_info.shtml
For press and media enquiries before and during the 19th MOP Please contact Nick Nuttall, Spokesperson of the United Nations Environment Programme Tel: +25420 7623084; mobile in Kenya: +254 (0) 733 632755, mobile when traveling: +41 79 596 57 37,
e-mail nick.nuttall@unep.org

FEATURED WEBSITE >>> First OzoneBlog http://www.unep.fr/ozonaction/blog.htm


31 July 2007

GLOBAL

Millennium Developments Goals Report 20071- Millennium Development Goals Report 2007
The eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) - which range from halving extreme poverty to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and providing universal primary education, all by the target date of 2015 - form a blueprint agreed to by all the world's countries and all the world's leading development institutions.
They have galvanized unprecedented efforts to meet the needs of the world's poorest.
The Millennium Development Goal Report is the highest-level update in the United Nations system about the status of implementation of these time-targeted goals agreed by all 191 Member States. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon launched the latest edition of this report on 2 July 2007.

At this mid-point in the path towards the 2015 MDG targets - which coincides with the 20th Anniversary of the signing of the Montreal Protocol - this report highlights how ozone layer protection contributes to the implementation of Goal 7, "Ensure environmental sustainability". In fact, this report indicates that the global efforts to protect the ozone layer is on the way to becoming an "unprecedented international success story" if we keep on track and meet the remaining compliance commitments.Consumption of all  ODS, 1989-2005 (Thousands of  metric tons of ozone-depleting potential)
[A global effort to eliminate ozone-depleting substances is working, though damage to the ozone layer will persist for some time
Emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODS) have been drastically reduced - from almost 1.5 billion tons in 1989 to 89 million tons in 2005 - since threats to the protective ozone layer were first recognized. The progress to date, 20 years after the Montreal Protocol was signed, demonstrates what can be achieved when countries act together, and in a concerted way, to resolve global environmental problems.
Concentrations of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have begun to recede in the atmosphere.
However, until they diminish significantly, the ozone layer cannot begin to heal and ultraviolet radiation will continue to harm human health, crop productivity and wildlife.
Since the 1990s, every region has exceeded its commitments under the Montreal Protocol. CFCs have already been phased out in developed countries, and developing countries are on track to do so by 2010.
Similarly, every region has reduced its consumption of other ozone-depleting substances. However, countries have yet to completely eliminate their use, which is in accordance with the timelines proposed under the Protocol. Complicating the issue is the fact that significant amounts of CFCs continue to be produced and traded illegally. Management of ODS stockpiles is another concern, since the cost of destroying them is high and environmentally unsound disposal methods could spew disastrous amounts of ozone depleting substances into the atmosphere. Maintaining momentum and funding for the final phase-out and for monitoring the ozone layer is crucial to a happy conclusion to this unprecedented international success story.]
Excerpt from The Millennium Development Goals 2007 Report
www.un.org/millenniumgoals

2- New Clues to Ozone Depletion
Source: Science Daily, Quoting the University of Leeds,
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070726104756.htm

LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN
3- Cuba Works to Protect the Ozone Layer
Source: Radio Habana Cuba, 6 July 2007, http://www.rhc.cu/ingles/portada.htm

NORTH AMERICA
4- Environment Canada - Federal Halocarbon Regulations (FHR)
Source: MOPIA's Monthly E-Bulletin, July 2007, http:// www.mopia.ca

SOUTH ASIA
5- Ulaan Baatar Declaration of Public-Private Partnership on Addressing Environmental Crime
At the conclusion of a unique workshop on "Combating Illegal Trade for Compliance with the Montreal Protocol in the Asia Pacific Region" that took place in the Mongo capital 28 - 29 June 2007, representatives of 11 countries, international organizations and non-governmental organizations declared their intention to combat illegal ODS trade through a series of specific measures. Read/Download full text http://www.unep.fr/ozonaction/information/mmcfiles/4865-e-ulaan_baatar_declaration.pdf
Source
: UNEP ROAP CAP, July 2007

SOUTH EAST ASIA AND PACIFIC
6- Recent Developments Relating to Ozone Depleting Substances
Source: The Pacific Regional Environment Programme [SPREP], 3 July 2007, by Nirupa Ram
http://www.sprep.org/publication/Digest.asp

7- Brunei Complies With Montreal Protocol
Source: Borneo Bulletin
http://www.brudirect.com/DailyInfo/News/Archive/July07/180707/nite02.htm

FEATURED READING >>>
- TEAP - Advance Copy of the Report of the Task Force on HCFC Issues (With Particular Focus on the Impact of the Clean Development Mechanism) and Emissions Reduction Benefits Arising from Earlier HCFC Phase-Out and Other Practical Measures - Response to Decision XVIII/12
http://ozone.unep.org/Assessment_Panels/TEAP/Reports/TEAP_
Reports/teap-taskforce-HCFC-july2007.pdf

- "Celebrating 20 Years of Progress in 2007" brochure issued by the Ozone Secretariat on the occasion of the 20th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol.
Arabic http://ozone.unep.org/Publications/20th_anniversary_info_kit-A.shtml
English http://ozone.unep.org/Publications/20th_anniversary_info_kit-E.shtml

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT >>>
For press and media enquiries before and during the 19th Meeting of the Parties Please contact Nick Nuttall, Spokesperson of the United Nations Environment Programme
Tel: +25420 7623084; mobile in Kenya: +254 (0) 733 632755, mobile when traveling: +41 79 596 57 37, e-mail
nick.nuttall@unep.org

The 19th Meeting of the Parties scheduled to take place from 17-21 September 2007 in Montreal, Canada. It will be preceded by: the 39th meeting of the Implementation Committee, which will be held 12-15 September 2007; the meeting of the Bureau of the 18th Meeting of the Parties, which will take place on 15 September 2007; and a 20th Anniversary Celebration Seminar on the Montreal Protocol, which will be held on 16 September 2007. For more information, contact: Ozone Secretariat; tel: +254-20-762-3850/1; fax: +254-20-762-4691/2/3; e-mail:
ozoneinfo@unep.org
;
Web:
http://ozone.unep.org/Events/19mop_advance_info.shtml


16 July 2007


GLOBAL
1- UNIDO Expert Group Meeting on Mechanisms for the Removal of Barriers to Chiller Replacements
The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) hosted an Expert Group Meeting on "Designing Mechanisms to Facilitate the Removal of Barriers to Chiller Replacements" from 2-4 July 2007, at UNIDO Headquarters in Vienna, Austria. Organized by the Multilateral Environmental Agreements Branch, the meeting was held within the framework of UNIDO's programme of regional chiller demonstration projects being undertaken in Africa, Eastern Europe and West Asia. This programme promotes energy efficient replacements for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based chillers through the stimulation of market conditions favourable to replacements.
The Expert Group Meeting (EGM) brought together 46 experts from 16 countries to discuss ways to overcome barriers to replacing CFC-based chillers, many of which commonly hinder other energy efficiency projects, with a view to identifying elements for incorporation into replacement strategies. Participants at the EGM focused on three themes: innovative chiller technologies; financial mechanisms for energy efficiency projects that could be employed in the chiller sub-sector; and regulatory support for promoting energy efficient chiller replacements. These themes were addressed through expert panel presentations and related discussions and also through deliberations in three working groups. Additionally, the meeting included a site visit to Austria's largest cooling plant, housed at Vienna General Hospital.
The EGM produced a set of recommendations for addressing technical, financial and regulatory barriers. These recommendations will provide the basis for specific deliverables to be used by UNIDO in assisting with the preparation of national strategies for replacing CFC-based chillers, and will also be used in the preparation of a UNIDO tool Kit on "Chiller Replacements between the Montreal and the Kyoto Protocol: Modalities for Implementation and Avenues of Financing." Additionally, the recommendations, together with the presentations and discussions held throughout the EGM, will be incorporated into a meeting report to be prepared by UNIDO.
Source: UNIDO Expert Group Meeting Bulletin - Vol. 143 No. 1 - a publication of the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), http://www.unido.org/doc/69394

AFRICA
2- 30 Refrigeration Technician Associations on MRM Training
Source: The Daily Observer (Banjul)? 13 June 2007, By Alhagie Jobe
http://allafrica.com/stories/200706130662.html

NORTH AMERICA
3- NASA Airborne Expedition Chases Climate, Ozone Questions
For more information about NASA's TC4 mission, visit: http://www.espo.nasa.gov/tc4
Source: NASA Press Release: 07-144
http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2007/jun/HQ_07144_TC4_Mission.html

SOUTH ASIA
4- China Closes Ozone Depleting Chemical Plants - A contribution to avert a global health catastrophe
Chiangshou,China 1 July 2007 - China, the world's largest producer of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) and halon, today shut down five of its six remaining plants, putting the country two and a half years ahead of the Montreal Protocol's 2010 deadline for phase-out of the two ozone depleting chemicals.
The facilities were closed during a symbolic ceremony organized by Chinese authorities in recognition of chemical companies' efforts to stop manufacturing products that harm the ozone layer and as part of the global 'Remembering Our Future' initiative sponsored by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).
Such chemicals contribute to weaken the Ozone layer allowing for dangerous ultraviolet radiation producing skin cancer, eye cataracts and suppression of human immune system.
Without the Montreal Protocol, levels of ozone depleting substances in the atmosphere would have increased tenfold by 2050, which could have led to up to 20 million more cases of skin cancer and 130 million more cases of eye cataracts relative to 1980.
The shut down of the five facilities, in Chiangshou City, near Shanghai, will bring China's production of CFCs to just about 550 metric tons, down from 55,000 metric tons at its peak in 1998. The remaining production is being kept strictly to produce CFCs for metered-dose inhalers, used in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The phase-out of the majority of CFC production marks the second major class of ozone depleting chemicals that China has ceased to produce. China has also recently ended the production of halon for emissive use, in other words, any use that will have the chemical eventually end up in the atmosphere.
China became the largest producer of ozone depleting chemicals following the shut down of plants producing these chemicals in developed countries in 1996. The closure of the Chinese plants now puts India and South Korea as leading producers of the two ozone depleting chemicals in Asia Pacific, with a remaining combined production level of about 15,000 m/tons.
Achim Steiner, UN Under Secretary-General and Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), said: "On the 20th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol, with more than 95% of the ozone depleting substances being phased out, the Protocol is among the great success stories of recent years. This success underlines how, with political will, creative financing mechanisms and the support for industry and NGOs, the international community can rise to the challenge of sustainable development."
"New research findings in 2007 also confirm that the phase outs are having other positive impacts, including on climate change. Scientists calculate that, over the period 1990 to 2010, the level of reductions will also equate in climate terms to the equivalent of eight Gigatonnes of carbon dioxide a year. This is one example of a virtuous circle, and I am convinced there are many others linked not only with ozone, but across a wide array of environmental treaties and agreements," Steiner said.
Katherine Sierra, Vice President for Sustainable Development at the World Bank, said: "The closure of CFC production facilities in China is marking a significant milestone not only for the Montreal Protocol, but also for the cooperation between the Government of China and the industry in their efforts to restore the ozone layer. A depleted ozone layer would have both adverse health and economic impacts to all nations. Action taken by China today contributes significantly to the global efforts in averting the global catastrophe on human health and ecosystem "
Added Sierra: "The Multilateral Fund has enabled China to contribute to the global efforts in protecting the ozone layer on an equal footing with all other nations without compromising its goal on sustainable development."
Chlorofluorocarbons are used in refrigerators and air conditioners, while halons are found in fire extinguishers. Thirty-one CFC/halon-producing factories have already been shut down earlier by Chinese authorities with support from the World Bank and the Montreal Protocol's Multilateral Fund. Closures were made possible because China has, over the years, developed ozone-friendly alternatives and adopted alternative technologies.
"The closure of these plants demonstrates China's continued commitment to meet its obligations under this treaty to phase out these chemicals. With the closing of these facilities, industry and consumers both here and in Asia Pacific must realize that there will soon be significant reductions in ozone depleting chemicals and that we should be prepared for the changes that are to come," said Zhang Lijun, Vice Minister, State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA).
Under the Montreal Protocol, which went into force in 1987, ozone depleting chemicals are being successfully phased out worldwide with assistance from the Montreal Protocol's Multilateral Fund. Ozone chemicals like CFCs and halon have been phased out in developed countries by 1996 except for small essential uses. By 2010, production of ozone depleting substances will be banned in developing countries, including countries in Asia and the Pacific, a region that accounts for 70 per cent of global consumption of CFC. To date, the Multilateral Fund has already financed activities to phase out of CFC consumption in more than 140 developing nations.
Contact: Satwant Kaur, UNEP ROAP, kaur@un.org
Ms. Xiaofang Zhou, Division for the Montreal Protocol Foreign Economic Cooperation Office (FECO), State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA), Beijing, China, P.R., zhou.xiaofang@sepafeco.org.cn
Source: UNEP ROAP News Release 07/11
http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=514&ArticleID=5624&l=en

SOUTH EAST ASIA AND PACIFIC
5- Philippine Refrigerant Reclamation PJT to Help Phase out CFCs
Source: Hoover's, Inc.,, Quoting Asia Pulse Businesswire, 4 July 2007
http://www.hoovers.com/free/news/detail.xhtml?ArticleID=200707043010.1_6ac20008c4d9015d

WEST ASIA
6- Adapting to Cooling Trends in the Market

Source: GulfNews, 11 June 2007, By Shakir Husain, Staff Reporter,
http://archive.gulfnews.com/articles/07/06/11/10131478.html

EUROPE
7- EU Sets Methyl Bromide CUEs (Critical use exemptions)
Source: AGROW - World Crop Protection News,
http://www.agrow.com/news.shtml

FEATURED WEBSITE >>> Activities in Ozone - UNEP Ozone Secretariat
Activities are taking place around the world to address challenges relating to the ozone layer. This website aims to provide information on key activities on the global level. This includes information on the Ozone Secretariat, which serves as the Secretariat for both the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer; the OzonAction Branch which assists developing countries and countries with economies in transition to achieve compliance with the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer; the Global Environment Facility Ozone projects which finance projects that phase out ozone depleting substances; and the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol which provides funding to help developing countries comply with obligations under the Protocol to phase out the use of ozone-depleting substances at an agreed schedule.
http://unep.org/themes/ozone/

FEATURED READING >>> 2006 Environmental Effects Assessment - Frequently Asked Questions
Questions and answers about the effects of the ozone layer depletion on humans and the environment.
http://ozone.unep.org/Assessment_Panels/EEAP/eeap-report2006-FAQ.pdf

UPCOMING MEETINGS >>>
- NINETEENTH MEETING OF THE PARTIES TO THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL: MOP-19 is scheduled to take place from 17-21 September 2007 in Montreal, Canada. It will be preceded by: the 39th meeting of the Implementation Committee, which will be held 12-15 September 2007; the meeting of the Bureau of the 18th Meeting of the Parties, which will take place on 15 September 2007; and a 20th Anniversary Celebration Seminar on the Montreal Protocol, which will be held on 16 September 2007. For more information, Contact: Ozone Secretariat; tel: +254-20-762-3850/1; fax: +254-20-762-4691/2/3; e-mail: ozoneinfo@unep.org; internet:
http://ozone.unep.org/Events/19mop_advance_info.shtml

- SYMPOSIUM ON THE TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL: A symposium on "Ozone Depletion: From its Discovery to Envisat and Aura," will be held in Athens, Greece, from 23-26 September 2007. At the invitation of a range of organizations, including UNEP, the World Meteorological Organization, the Academy of Athens and the National Observatory of Athens among others, individuals who have played a key role in the success of the Montreal Protocol will gather to present the latest scientific results on ozone and to discuss the implementation of the Montreal Protocol. For more information, contact: the Symposium Secretariat; fax: +30-210-349-0120;
email: zerefos@geol.uoa.gr; internet:
http://www.20yearsmontrealprotocol.org/


26 June 2007

GLOBAL

1- Montreal Protocol Dialogue Considers Accelerated HCFC Phase-out
The Dialogue on key future challenges faced by the Montreal Protocol (the Dialogue) was held 2-3 June 2007 in Nairobi, Kenya. Participants offered comments on funding options for continued monitoring and scientific assessment activities, combating illegal trade, and the future of the Multilateral Fund, and considered an accelerated phase-out of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), the possibility of capping the quantity of methyl bromide for quarantine and preshipment uses, banks of ozone-depleting substances (ODS), and essential-use exemptions for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and critical use exemptions for methyl bromide (IISD RS sources:
http://ozone.unep.org/Meeting_Documents/dkfc/1dkfc/index.shtml
)

OEWG Drafts Decisions
The 27th meeting of the Open-ended Working Group of the parties to the Montreal Protocol (OEWG-27) was held 4-7 June 2007 in Nairobi, Kenya. Parties forwarded numerous draft decisions to the nineteenth Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol (MOP-19), which will convene in Montreal, Canada, from 17-21 September 2007. The draft decisions address, inter alia: essential use exemptions, the laboratory and analytical use exemption, process agents, replenishment of the Multilateral Fund, systems for monitoring transboundary movements of ODS, and refinement of the institutional arrangements of the Montreal
Protocol. Parties also considered proposals to reduce the frequency of meetings and to adjust the Protocol with respect to the phase-out of HCFCs (IISD RS sources
:
http://ozone.unep.org/Meeting_Documents/oewg/27oewg/index.shtml

http://ozone.unep.org/Meeting_Documents/oewg/27oewg/OEWG-27-9E.pdf
)
Source: MEABulletin Issue N° 28, 21 June 2007,

http://www.iisd.ca/mea-l/meabulletin28.pdf

2- The 51st Meeting of the Executive Committee Summary of the Significant Decisions and Discussions outlined in the post meeting summary now available on the Multilateral Fund website at
http://www.multilateralfund.org/summaries_of_executive_committ.htm

A complete record of all decisions made at the 51st Meeting, including those covered in this document, can be found in the 'Report of the Fifty-first Meeting of the Executive Committee of the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol' (UNEP/OzL.Pro/ExCom/51/46) on the Multilateral Fund's website www.multilateralfund.org in the Meetings/final reports section.


NORTH AMERICA

3- Compound Allowed as Alternative to Ozone-Depleting Chemicals
More information about Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP)
Source: NewsBlaze, Daily News
4- High-Temperature Adhesives Come in Portable Cylinder
Source
: ThomasNet Industrial Newsroom, 4 June 2007

SOUTH ASIA
3- Transition Plan Ready to Make Non-CFC MDI
Source: Bangladesh Times,
http://www.newstoday-bd.com/metropolis.asp?newsdate=5/24/2007

SOUTH EAST ASIA AND PACIFIC
4- The Philippine's Science High School Wins First On-Line Ozone Quiz
Source: Bayanihan, 28 May 2007,
http://www.bayanihan.org/html/article.php/20070528170628345

EUROPE
5- AFCE Announces New Refrigerants Regulation

Source: REFRIGE.com, 22 May 2007,
http://www.refrige.com/archive-industry-news/may-2007/
afce-announces-new-refrigerants-regulation-1064.html


FEATURED WEBSITE >>> American Lung Association's mission is to prevent lung disease and promote lung health. Two CFC-Free Inhalers PSAs (Photoshop Albums) in English and Spanish are available at
http://www.lungusa.org/site/pp.asp?c=dvLUK9O0E&b=2222599


FEATURED READING >>> "Strengthening the Montreal Protocol: Insurance Against Abrupt Climate Change", by Donald Kaniaru, Rajendra Shende, Scott Stone, Durwood Zaelke, published in the Winter 2007 issue of Sustainable Development Law & Policy.
The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer has been efficient and effective in reducing damage to the ozone layer. It also has contributed significantly to climate mitigation. This paper recommends further adjustments to the treaty to help finish the job of protecting the ozone layer and provide further though temporary insurance against the threat of abrupt climate change.
Available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, and Spanish


10 June 2007

GLOBAL
1- Ozzy and Zoe Ozone invite the World's Children to Take Action on Ozone, Climate and Pollutants- Animated cartoon book "Ozzy goes polar" is launched on World Environment Day
Source: UNEP IPY Joint Press Release, 5 June 2007
2- Countries Report on Montreal Protocol Implementation
Source:
IISD, MEA Bulletin, http://www.iisd.ca/mea-l/meabulletin27.pdf
NORTH AMERICA
3- Compound Allowed as Alternative to Ozone-Depleting Chemicals
Source:
NewsBlaze, Daily News
4- High-Temperature Adhesives Come in Portable Cylinders
Source:
ThomasNet Industrial Newsroom, 4 June 2007
SOUTH ASIA
5- Chinese Customs Officers Train to Detect Environmental Crimes
Source:
ENS, 18 May 2007
SOUTH EAST ASIA AND PACIFIC
6- Customs Seize 5000 Cars (Fiji)
Source:
The Fiji Times, 31 May 2007

FEATURED WEBSITE >>> "Natural Refrigerants Fund"
Aim: Implementation of technologies with natural refrigerants in developing countries together with developed countries.
Learn more >>>

FEATURED READING >>>
The Environmental Investigation Agency, Global Environment Campaign: Reports and Briefings:
- Preventing illegal trade in ODS: Strengthening the Montreal Protocol licensing system
- HCFC Phase-out: A comparative Assessment of the Proposed Adjustments
- An Unwelcome Encore, The Illegal trade in HCFCs
The above and Other Reports are also available from EIA website


22 May 2007

Special Announcement:
20th Anniversary Awards/Contests
In honor of the 20th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol, the Ozone Secretariat will, in cooperation with selected judges/judging panels, be issuing a variety of recognition awards, all of which are now open for nomination. The Ozone Secretariat will also be hosting a number of contests.
Click here to send nominations for the awards
For information on how to send in entries for the contests, click here


GLOBAL
1- New Report Summarizes Ozone Layer Protection
Source: Environmental Resource Center, http://www.ercweb.com/resources/tips.aspx

2- Kyoto Treaty Generates some Perverse Incentives
Further information
>>> http://www.iisd.ca/media/climate_atmosphere.htm#ozone
Source: The Economist, 23 April 2007
http://www.economist.com/world/international/displaystory.cfm?story_id=9059486


Latin Amercia and Caribbean
3- Countries Call Attention to the Climate Benefits of Repairing the Ozone Layer
Source: International network for Environmental Compliance and Enforcement (INECE), issue 14, April 2007, http://www.inece.org/newsletter/14/inecenews.html

4- Colombian Flower Growers Win EPA Ozone Protection Awards
Source: US EPA, http://www.epa.gov/ozone/awards/index.html and
FlorVerde, http://www.florverde.org/florverde-news-pr3.html

North America
5- Fact Sheet - Notice Of Proposed Rulemaking: Listing Of Substitutes For Ozone-Depleting Substances - n-Propyl Bromide In Adhesives, Coatings, And Aerosols
Source: USEPA, 15 May 2007,
http://www.epa.gov/ozone/snap/solvents/FactSheet_ProposalnPB5907.html


South Asia
6- Ozone Healing Under Global Warming Cloud
Source: Financial Express, By: Rajiv Tikoo
http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=164113

WEST ASIA
7- Yemen Confirms Commitment to Montreal Protocol
Source: Yemen Times. 8 May 2007,
http://yementimes.com/article.shtml?i=1049&p=local&a=5

See also UNEP ROWA CAP, Press Release, 10 May 2007
http://www.unep.fr/ozonaction/information/mmcfiles/4854-e-pr0507westasia_sanaa.pdf


FEATURED READING >>> FACT SHEET No. 18 - STATUS REPORT ON HCFC
HCFC is a controlled substance under the Montreal Protocol and has been mainly used as refrigerant even before the Montreal Protocol; As the implementation of the Montreal Protocol, HCFC is now also widely used in the refrigeration, foam, solvent, aerosol and fire fighting sectors
as a transitional substance to substitute CFCs due to its low ODP. HCFC is also used as feedstock for other chemical products.
This fact-sheet is aimed to brief the NOUs of Article 5 countries on the issues surrounding the HCFC. It would highlight the HCFC production and consumption trends in both Article 2 countries and Article 5 countries, summarize the study of environmental impacts it would pose, reflect the
progress of alternatives development and highlight the need to take action.
Full text @ http://www.unep.fr/ozonaction/information/mmcfiles/4766-e-18statushcfcs.pdf


30 April 2007


Special Announcement:
UNEP DTIE offices moved to new premises as of 30 April 2007.
The new location is: 15 rue de Milan, 75009 Paris, France
Telephone/Fax numbers and emails/web addresses remain the same.

GLOBAL
1- Post Meeting Summary of Decisions of the 51st Meeting of the Executive Committee of the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol
The 51st Meeting of the Executive Committee, which took place in Montreal from 19 to 23 March 2007, was attended by the representatives of the 14 Executive Committee member Parties and by participants co-opted from 21 other countries. Mr. Philippe Chemouny of Canada presided over his first meeting as Chair of the Executive Committee.
The President and Vice-President of the Implementation Committee of the Montreal Protocol, three representatives of the Ozone Secretariat, representatives of the implementing agencies and representatives of the Alliance for Responsible Atmospheric Policy and Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) also attended the meeting.
The Executive Committee followed its standard programme of work for the first meeting of the year which included the consideration of business plans, evaluation reports and the implementing agencies' work programmes. Business planning, the process of allocating financial resources to Article 5 countries according to their compliance needs, was especially important since the 2010 targets for CFC phase-out were only three years away. A number of other issues were addressed including the progress and finalisation of contracting a consultant for the study on the treatment of unwanted ozone depleting substances (ODS) and the terms of reference for a study on administrative costs of implementing agencies beyond 2008.
At the 51st Meeting, the Executive Committee approved investment projects and work programme activities with a value of almost US $50.7 million, plus US $3.9 million in support costs for implementing agencies, and took a total of 39 decisions. To read the most significant decisions and discussions/Download a PDF >>> http://www.multilateralfund.org/files/51/PMS51.pdf
SOURCE: Secretariat of the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol

AFRICA
2- EPA, Commerce Sign MOU [Liberia]
SOURCE: The Analyst (Monrovia), 23 April 2007, By J. Ebenezer Daygbor
http://allafrica.com/stories/200704230255.html

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
3- Countries Call Attention to the Climate Benefits of Repairing the Ozone Layer

An adjustment to the Montreal Protocol could reduce greenhouse gas emissions by an amount equal to the reductions mandated under the Kyoto Protocol. In light of this new scientific evidence, a unique coalition of developing and developed country Parties is pushing for an accelerated phase-out of HCFCs, used primarily as refrigerants for air conditioners. These chemicals both destroy the ozone layer and contribute substantially to global warming.
The efforts are being led by Argentina, who submitted a joint proposal with Brazil to "adjust" the ozone treaty to maximize climate benefits. Similar proposals were submitted by Mauritius, Mauritania, the Federated States of Micronesia, and Palau. Norway, Switzerland, and Iceland submitted a joint proposal, and the United States submitted one as well. All of the Parties submitting proposals are calling for the accelerated phase-out of HCFCs at the September 20 th Anniversary Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, the international treaty that entered into force in 1989 to protect the ozone layer.
In addition to its success in protecting the ozone layer, the Montreal Protocol has been the most effective treaty so far in curbing greenhouse gases. Some of the substances regulated by the Protocol, such as CFCs, are greenhouse gases that are over ten-thousand times more potent than carbon dioxide. An important scientific study published last month calculates that by 2010, the Protocol's phase-out of ozone-depleting substances will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by an amount 11 times greater than the emissions targets of the Kyoto Protocol. This extraordinary accomplishment has already delayed the effects of climate change by up to 12 years.
With the proposed adjustments, the study calculates that further climate reductions are available under the Montreal Protocol, equal to 5-6 times Kyoto's mandated reductions. The Protocol currently schedules HCFCs for phase-out later this century, but their increased use, particularly in developing countries, has heightened concerns over their potentially devastating impacts on both the ozone layer and the climate. The most widely used HCFC is HCFC-22, which is 1,700 times more powerful at warming the planet than carbon dioxide. Additionally, production of HCFC-22 results in by-product emissions of another greenhouse gas, HFC-23, which is 11,000 times more powerful than carbon dioxide.
Romina Picolotti, Argentina's Minister of Environment and a member of the INECE Executive Planning Committee, is a principal proponent of the accelerated phase-out. She noted that "if we accelerate the phase-out of HCFCs, we are going to make a great contribution to climate change, and to healing the ozone layer, which will reduce our vulnerability to dangerous ultraviolet radiation."
In a policy article published last month, Donald Kaniaru, Rajendra Shende, Scott Stone, and Durwood Zaelke developed a strategy to maximize the climate benefits of the Montreal Protocol, and show that the Protocol has the potential to provide low-cost "insurance" against abrupt climate change, by further delaying climate forcing and effectively buying the world more time to get the post-Kyoto regime in place and the global carbon market running efficiently. The authors highlight the need to accelerate the phase-out of HCFCs, except where there are superior environmental benefits, when both ozone and climate impacts are considered; to address the banks of CFCs and other ozone depleting substances stored in old equipment and products, which will otherwise be emitted at products' end-of-life and contribute climate emissions equal to 7.4 times Kyoto's mandated reductions, in the same general time period; to require a destruction off-set for any continuing HCFC use; and to address compliance and enforcement issues, in light of illegal trade estimated to be 10 to 20% of total trade.
The success of the Montreal Protocol so far in healing the ozone layer and reducing greenhouse gas emissions can be attributed to several factors: universal membership in the Protocol of 191 countries; a strong network of experience ozone officers in every Party; a strong history of successful technological innovation and transfer, based on a continuous process of treaty adjustment and amendment; and a dedicated funding mechanism in the Multilateral Fund, supplemented by the Global Environmental Facility for Parties with economies in transition. The Montreal Protocol can and should have a greater role in climate protection.
For more information, please see: Donald Kaniaru, Rajendra Shende, Scott Stone, & Durwood Zaelke, Strengthening the Montreal Protocol: Insurance Against Abrupt Climate Change (pdf), 7 Sustainable Development Law & Policy 3 (2007); Guus J.M. Velders, et. al., The importance of the Montreal Protocol in protecting climate, 104 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 4814 (2007); Environmental Investigation Agency, Turning Up the Heat: Linkages Between Ozone Layer Depletion and Climate Change: The Urgent Case of HCFCs and HFCs (pdf) (August 2006).
SOURCE: International Network for Environmental Compliance and enforcement (INECE), Issue 14, April 2007, http://www.inece.org/newsletter/14/inecenews.html

NORTH AMERICA
4- Best-of-the-Best Stratospheric Ozone Protection Awards

On the occasion of the 2007 20-year anniversary of the Montreal Protocol, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will present the 2007 Best-of-the-Best Stratospheric Ozone Protection Awards.
These awards recognize corporations, associations, teams and individuals that have demonstrated exceptional leadership and personal dedication in either technical achievements in eliminating ozone-depleting substances or protecting the public from the effects of exposure to increased ultraviolet radiation. Successful applicants will have demonstrated: passion for stratospheric ozone protection, actions that have reduced and eliminated emissions and strengthened national and Montreal Protocol policy, leadership that inspires others, collaboration, capacity building, and/or strategic networking. Candidates for these awards must have earned an annual Stratospheric Protection Award from the U.S. EPA between 1990 and 2007.
EPA plans to present the 2007 Best-of-the-Best Awards on or around 16 September 2007 in Montreal , Canada at a gala dinner in conjunction with the Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol.
Learn more >>>
http://www.epa.gov/ozone/awards/bestofthebest/NomForm_Ozone_BotB_2007.doc

Contact: Godwin.Dave, Godwin.Dave@epa.gov
SOURCE: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

SOUTH ASIA
5- India a Favoured Destination for Smuggled CFCs
SOURCE: 14 April 2007, By: Ranvir Nayar,
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/51743.html

SOUTH EAST ASIA AND PACIFIC
6- UN Calls on Media to Call Attention to Ozone Layer

SOURCE: Vietnam News Agency (VNS), 25 April 2007,
http://vietnamnews.vnagency.com.vn/showarticle.php?num=01ENV250407

WEST ASIA
7- Ridding of Ozone Depleting Materials

SOURCE: Yemen Times , 24 April 2007
http://yementimes.com/article.shtml?i=776&p=business&a=3

FEATURED EVENT >>>
The 7th European Conference on technological innovations in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry will this year focus on legislative, technical, and environmental issues affecting the choice of new refrigerants, such as R744 (CO2). Learn more >>> http://www.centrogalileo.it/milano/CONGRESSODIMILANO2007english.html


15 April 2007

GLOBAL
1- The Multilateral Fund eyes the 2010 target

The Executive Committee of the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol met last week to approve US $54.6 million for 32 developing countries to eliminate over 20,000 ODP of ozone depleting substances (ODS). Projects approved by the Executive Committee included US $24 million for China to dismantle CFC production plants thus ending production of CFCs more than two years ahead of the 2010 deadline for CFC elimination set by the Montreal Protocol. Smaller projects in Bolivia, the Seychelles, Paraguay and Zimbabwe received funding for their plans to phase-out the use of CFCs in their refrigeration servicing sectors, an area where success is directly related to the achievement of the 2010 deadline.
In the context of its continuous financial planning process, the Executive Committee established a number of specific priorities for unallocated funds in its triennial budget including among others, support for any new Parties to the Montreal Protocol and any extra support needed for national ozone units in developing countries. Another priority is accelerating the elimination of CFC production and the World Bank will investigate the possibilities of advanced CFC phase-out in countries like Argentina and India. If the remaining CFC producer countries were to agree to an accelerated plan, all CFC production in developing countries could be completely eliminated well ahead of the 2010 deadline. Cessation of CFC production is key to reducing the market availability and increasing price of CFCs. This will encourage users to switch to substitutes that do not harm the ozone layer. Currently such substitutes are more costly than CFCs.
Contact: Julia Anne Dearing, Information Management Officer, Secretariat of the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol secretariat@unmfs.org
SOURCE: UNMFS, Press Release, www.multilateralfund.org

NORTH AMERICA
2- Climate Change Product Found on Shelves - MOPIA Calls for Removal of Air horn Containing HFCs

WINNIPEG, CANADA - The Manitoba Ozone Protection Industry Association (MOPIA) is issuing this bulletin to inform the public and retailers that certain products which contain substances harmful to the environment and regulated under the Manitoba Ozone Depleting Substances and Other Halocarbons Regulation 103/94 have been seen available for purchase at various Manitoba retailers. The specific products are Air Horns (marine or sport) and their refill companions that contain 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane, (also known as a hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)). They are manufactured by at least two U.S. based companies including Unified Marine (Naples, Florida) and LPI Consumers Products (Pompano Beach, Florida). These are products that when used, contribute to climate change. MOPIA is in the process of informing various stakeholders, including retailers and manufacturers that these types of products if they contain regulated substances are prohibited to be released to the environment and must not be displayed for sale. The prohibited substance contained in these specific devices is 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, a Class 3 substance also known as HFC 134a, a substance with a global warmingpotential (GWP) of 1,300.If the public comes across either or these specific products or others which contain a regulated or prohibited substance, you should advise the retailers’ management, Manitoba Conservation or contact MOPIA directly for further guidance or information. Check the retailers return policy regarding any unopened product(s).Canada is a signatory to two international environmental treaties, the Montreal and Kyoto Protocols. Provincial legislation including the Manitoba Ozone Depleting Substances and Other Halocarbons Regulation has controls on specific substances that harm the ozone layer and contribute to climate change.MOPIA encourages Manitoban’s to participate and become aware of the challenges of ozone depletion and climate change. Manitoba is unique in that it has one of the most dynamic atmosphere protection programs in the world. MOPIA maintains a wealth of resource materials, including videos and internet resources, from worthy sources around the world. These are available through free loan to students, industry stakeholders and the general public.
Contact: Mark Miller, Executive Director, mopia@mts.net
SOURCE: MOPIA Press Release, 3 April 2007, www.mopia.ca

3- Listing of Ozone Depleting Substitutes in Foam Blowing Fact Sheet (Final Rule)
Action
On March 19, 2007, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized a rule determining that two ozone depleting chemicals scheduled to be phased out in 2010, HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b, are unacceptable substitutes under the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program (section 612 of the Clean Air Act) as foam blowing agents for CFCs and HCFC-141b. This rule expedites the transition of HCFC-22 and -142b to alternatives which contributes to the accomplishments of the Montreal Protocol.
EPA issued this rulemaking as a result of progress within the insulation foam industry on adopting non-ozone depleting chemicals.
- EPA is finding HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b unacceptable substitutes for HCFC-141b in commercial refrigeration, sandwich panels, slabstock, and “other” rigid polyeurethane foams (referred to as “pour foam” applications).
- Because of technical challenges in transitioning to alternatives, existing users of HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b in pour foam applications other than marine flotation foam will be allowed to continue use until March 1, 2008.
- Users of HCFC-22 and HCFC 142b for marine foam applications will be allowed to continue to use these chemicals until September 1, 2009.
- Existing users of HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b in extruded polystyrene can continue their use until January 1, 2010.
This rule will address effects of stratospheric ozone depletion and health and environmental impacts of substitutes for ozone-depleting substances. The ultimate impact will be to reduce skin cancer, cataracts, and other adverse impacts of ozone depletion.
Background
- The phaseout schedule for HCFCs was issued under the Clean Air Act in 1993. Under this schedule, production and import of HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b will be phased out on January 1, 2010 in the U.S.
- Under the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program (Section 612 of the Clean Air Act), EPA reviews alternatives to Class I and Class II ozone depleting substances (ODS) and approves use of alternatives which reduce the overall risk to public health and the environment.
Additional information on the use of HCFCs and alternatives in foam can be found at
http://www.epa.gov/ozone/snap

Contact: Jeff Cohen, US EPAOffice of Atmosphere Programs cohen.jeff@epa.gov
SOURCE: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),
http://www.epa.gov/ozone/snap/foams/FinalNPRMfactsheet.html

4- CFCs Case Propels German Team to Victory
SOURCE: DC Velocity, April 2007 issue,
http://www.dcvelocity.com/news/?article_id=821

SOUTH ASIA
5- Montreal Protocol: A Quiet Revolution But Challenges Ahead
Thimphu, April 11 As the world celebrates the 20th anniversary of the Montreal Protocol, a key meeting of 24 countries of South and Southeast Asia and the Pacific region began here with satisfaction in protecting and restoring the ozone layer and introspections about the climatic challenges lying ahead.
The participants in the meeting were informed that 85 percent of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) had been phased out while the remaining 15 percent would be nullified in time for the 2010 deadline.
Inaugurating the Conference at the YHS auditorium in this neat and quaint mountain city with refreshingly clean air, Bhutan's Trade and Industry Minister Yeshey Zimba highlighted the intergenerational equity, an important part of the proposed constitution of the country.
'This theme is in consonance with the environment chapter of the Draft Constitution and as Bhutan marches into democracy, this fundamental principle will guide the state policy towards the road to sustainable development,' he said.
'Environment is one of the four pillars of our development philosophy of Gross National Happiness enunciated by His Majesty the 4th King Jigme Singye Wangchuk,' Zimba said.
Bhutan's Environment Minister Nado Rinchpin told the gathering that the region faces the challenge of phasing out the remaining 15 percent of CFCs in time during the next three years.
'While 85 percent of CFCs had been phased out, it was a huge challenge to ensure that the balance 15 percent were also phased out in time for the 2010 deadline,' he said.
Rajendra Shende, head of the OzonAction Unit of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), said tackling environmental related issues is a challenge to be faced jointly by the international community.
While as CFC threat to ozone has been reduced to a great extent, the methyl bromide, exempted so far, poses a complex threat.
According to Shende, nothing has been done to find a suitable alternative for methyl bromide, which is used as a preservative for food products and nothing, especially by the countries with strong farm lobby, has been done to find a suitable alternative for it. 'Without a clear phase-out plan, there will be no pressure on the developed countries to find a solution which is ozone friendly. Hence we must try to get a deadline for phase out of methyl bromide as well,' Shende said.
Shende praised the Bhutan government for its proactive and prompt action to preserve the environment.
SOURCE: earthtimes.org, 11 April 2007, By: Ranvir Nayar,
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/50370.html

WEST ASIA
6- Jordanian Ministry of Environment Receives International Award

Amman, April 1 (Petra)-- The Ministry of Environment has received an international award for implementing the Montreal Protocol marking the 20th anniversary of launching the protocol.
SOURCE: Petra, 1 April 2007, By: Ashkar,
http://www.petra.gov.jo/nepras/2007/Apr/01/14000.htm

EUROPEAN NETWORK
7- Turkey's Halon Bank

SOURCE: The Anatolian Times, 9 April 2007,
http://www.anatoliantimes.com/hbr2.asp?id=170657

FEATURED >>>
In advance of the upcoming Open-Ended Working Group meeting (OEWG-27), to be held on 4-7 June 2007, and the Dialogue on key future challenges faced by the Montreal Protocol (the Dialogue), to be held on 2-3 June 2007, the Ozone Secretariat has released numerous documents, including, inter alia, an agenda for the Dialogue, and an annotated provisional agenda and information note for OEWG-27 >>> http://ozone.unep.org/highlights.shtml


20 March 2007

GLOBAL
1- Effects of Solar UV Radiation on Aquatic Ecosystems and Interactions with Climate Change External site
D.-P. Häder, H. D. Kumar, R. C. Smith and R. C. Worrest
SOURCE: Royal Society of Chemistry, 27 February 2007
NORTH AMERICA
2- U.S. Proposes Quick Phaseout of Ozone Damaging Chemicals External site
For more information about the phaseout proposal click here
For more on alternative refrigerants
click here
SOURCE: Environment News Service (ENS), 16 March 2007

3-
CBP to Assess Fines for Violation of the Wood Packaging Import Regulations External site
For more information on the implementation and enforcement of the WPM regulations and related guidelines on liquidated damages and penalties, please visit the CBP website at http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/import/commercial_enforcement/wpm/
SOURCE: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 8 March 2007 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/

SOUTH ASIA
4- Crackdown on Illegal Trade in Chemicals that Damage Ozone Layer External site
SOURCE: BERNAMA, 1 March 2007, By: By D. Arul Rajoo
5- Small Inventions that Help Clean the Environmen
SOURCE: The Morning Leader, Sri Lanka, January 17, 2007, Vol. 2, No. 29, By Dilrukshi Handunnetti
WEST ASIA
6- Yemen Contributes to Ozone Protection External site
SOURCE: Yemen Times,SANA'A, 4 March 2007
FEATURED READING >>>
- 27th OEWG: Proposal by the Federated States of Micronesia for adjustment of the Montreal Protocol (E)
- Primer for members of the Implementation Committee under the Non-compliance Procedure of the Montreal Protocol (E)
-
Refrigeration, Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps Technical Options Committee: 2006 Assessment
-
Technology and Economic Assessment Panel: 2006 Assessment
- Rigid and Flexible Foams Technical Options Committee: 2006 Assessme
nt
- Chemicals Technical Options Committee: 2006 Assessment
-
Refrigeration, Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps Technical Options Committee: 2006 Assessment
- Twenty Questions and Answers about the Ozone Layer: 2006 Update
- OzonAction Newsletter issue # 53 (E)


6 March 2007

SPECIAL ISSUE
on The Importance of the Montreal Protocol
in Protecting Climate

Statement by Achim Steiner, UN Under-Secretary General and UN Environment Programme Executive Director, on the Publication of the Scientific Paper The Importance of the Montreal Protocol in Protecting Climate.

5 March 2007-- I welcome today's publication of research underlining the important contribution to combating climate change made by the parallel push to reduce chemicals that damage the ozone layer the Earths protective shield.
The climate dimension of the Montreal Protocol is a story that is not widely known, but one that deserves more consideration by the communities involved in ozone and climate protection.
I believe the study, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, underscores the simple fact that well-devised action to address one area of environmental concern can have multiple environmental benefits across numerous others.
It also highlights that calculating the costs of environmental action, based on narrow economic criteria, often fails to capture the wider economic opportunities and benefits that are likely to emerge.
The scientists from the Netherlands and the United States have for the first time in detail calculated the contribution to climate protection from the phasing out and reduction of chemicals like chloroflurocarbons (CFCs).
The chemicals, once commonplace in products like hair sprays and fridges, deplete the thin layer of ozone gas that filters out damaging levels of ultra violet light.
CFCs, along with a wide range of other ozone depleting substances, are being successfully phased out, reduced and controlled under the 1987 Montreal Protocol established under the auspices of UNEP. A Multilateral Fund has been created to help developing countries meet their compliance commitments with this treaty.
The researchers point out that repair of the ozone layer is not the only benefit emerging from the Montreal treaty.
They calculate that, over the period 1990 to 2010, the level of reductions will also equate in climate terms to the equivalent of eight Giga tonnes of carbon dioxide a year.
In comparison the Kyoto Protocol the climate emissions reductions treaty and widely understood as a first step towards even bigger emission reductions necessary is scheduled to deliver cuts in greenhouse gases equivalent to two Giga tonnes annually over the same period.
Guus Velders of MNP, the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, and colleagues believe the ozone layer protection treaty can contribute even more to combating climate change.
Some of the chemicals, introduced as alternatives to CFCs, contribute to climate change themselves, while others contribute through chemical byproducts during the the production process. Such chemicals include HCFCs and HFCs.
The researchers suggest that a combination of accelerated phase-out, the introduction of further alternatives with low greenhouse gas characteristics and relatively small changes in industrial practices, could deliver further climate benefits equivalent to somewhere over one Giga tones of carbon dioxide.
When this climate dimension is taken into consideration, the Montreal Protocol - which is already considered to be a highly-effective treaty that is achieving its objective is even more cost-effective because of this collateral climate benefit. This is a particularly important message coming as it does during 2007, a year that marks both the 20th Anniversary of the signing of the Montreal Protocol and the 10th Anniversary of the signing of the Kyoto Protocol.
I believe these kinds of findings should spur governments, business, civil society and individuals to look at the wider impacts of their decisions including the costs and the benefits.
Take health hazardous heavy metals like mercury for example. Research indicates that the biggest single contributor to new sources of mercury in the global environment and the food chain comes from the increased burning of coal.
There is also some evidence that rising temperatures in freshwaters like lakes is causing old mercury, locked away in sediments, to be mobilized and released back into the environment.
Thus reducing emissions from coal-fired power stations can not only contribute to combating climate change but also contribute directly and indirectly to reducing the serious threats from mercury pollution.
I know and am sure that there are many, many more example of these virtuous circles positive cost benefit case studies that have been brought into sharp focus by this new research on the climate benefits of combating damage to the ozone layer.
Notes to Editors
Web address of the paper The importance of the Montreal Protocol in protecting the climate, Guus J.M.Velders, Stephen O. Andersen, John S Daniel, David W. Fahey, Mack McFarland.
http://www.eurekalert.org/bysubject/earthscience.php

MEDIA CONTACT:
Anneke Oosterhuis, Press Office (Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency), Bilthoven, the Netherlands;
tel +31 30 274 3303, email:anneke.oosterhuis@mnp.nl
For More Information Please Contact:
Nick Nuttall, UNEP Spokesperson, on Tel: +41 79 596 5737 or E-mail:nick.nuttall@unep.org

Dual Benefits Ozone Protocol: Protecting Ozone Layer and Climate
The 1987 Montreal Protocol - restricting the use of ozone-depleting substances - has helped to both reduce global warming and protect the ozone layer.
Source: Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Press release; 5 March 2007
Contact: Anneke Oosterhuis, press officer MNP, +31.30.2743033,
anneke.oosterhuis@mnp.nl

DuPont Scientist among Authors of Article on Climate Benefit of Montreal Protocol
DuPont yesterday reinforced the findings of a group of leading scientists that show the Montreal Protocol treaty has had a significant impact on protecting the Earth's climate, as well as its ozone layer.
Source: DuPont News, 6 March 2007


28 February 2007

GLOBAL
1- First Antarctic Education Base to Open External site
Source:
Associated Content, 16 February 2007, By Allen Butler
NORTH AMERICA
2- Proper Disposal of Old Appliances External site
Source:
IIF/IIR Newsletter, January 2007, quoting US EPA
SOUTH ASIA
3- Cool Rooms in Asia Warming the Planet External site
Source:
The International Herald Tribune, 22 February 2007, By Keith Bradsher
4- Defence Scientists Develop New Fire-Fighting Compound External site
Source:
Daily India.com, 16 February 2007
5- Tosoh F-Tech to Promote Zero-ODP Fluorocarbon Alternative External site
Source:
HooversCom, 23 February 2007
EUROPE
6- 'How bad is it, Doc?': In Antarctica, scientists diagnose ozone layer External site
Source:
Agence France Presse, 15 February 2007, By Guy Clavel
English | French
FEATURED WEBSITE >>>

20 Sessions for the 20th Anniversary: Ozone Layer Protection Questions and Answers

Your questions, and the answers provided by the staff of UNEP's Compliance Assistance Programme (CAP), will stimulate public dialogue on ozone issues and thereby contribute to the celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol.
UNEP DTIE OzonAction website >>>
FEATURED READING >>>
- 27th OEWG: Provisional Agenda External site
(English)
- Report of the Halons Technical Options Committee: 2006 Assessment External site


15 February 2007
GLOBAL
1- The Multilateral Fund: A Culture of Success
External site
In a Statement to the 24th Session of the UNEP Governing Council, 7 February 2007, Maria Nolan, Chief Officer of the Secretariat of the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol, said that the Fund is an example of successful international environmental cooperation… "Today in the year 2007 the overwhelming majority of developing countries are now well positioned to comply with the impending control measures for ODS set by the Montreal Protocol and we can rightly celebrate its 20th anniversary. Yet despite this considerable success I must express a few words of caution. So far the Fund's work has been relatively straightforward but there are still substantial challenges ahead."

Read the statement >>>

AFRICA

2- Namibia: No More Imports of Chlorofluorocarbons By 2010 External site
AllAfricaCom, Quoting: New Era (Windhoek), 8 February 2007, By Wezi Tjaronda
NORTH AMERICA
3- Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Buildings and CFCs. External site
For more information >>>

MOPIA Monthly e-Bulletin on Ozone Layer Protection, January 2007

4-
New Technology Cools Effect of Air Conditioners on Climate External site
For more Information on EPA's Mobile Air Conditioning Climate Protection Partnership >>>
Contact: Roxanne Smith, smith.roxanne@epa.gov
US EPA, Press Release 1 February 2007
WEST ASIA

5- Corporate Responsibility to an Annual State of the Environment Report Announced Under New Pan Arab Initiative Forum for Environment & Development Launches Programmes at UNEP Governing Council External site
Detailed information can be accessed through AFED website.
Contact: Najib Saab. Tel: +961 1321 800; E-mail: info@afedonline.org
UNEP News Release 2007/07
EUROPE
6- Melanoma Market: Rising Incidence Represents Significant Opportunities External site
Pharmaceutical Business Review Online, 2 February 2007

30 January 2007

NORTH AMERICA

1- Food Lion Joins U.S. EPA's GreenChill Initiative to Advance Environmentally Friendly Refrigeration External site
PR News Wire, 16 January 2007

2-
PAN asking for comments to EPA on chloropicrin External site
PANUPS updates service
SOUTH ASIA
3- Total Ozone Over Japanese Antarctic Station Hits New Low [Records] External site Japan for Sustainability, 12 January 2007 >>>
The article is also available in Japanese language >>>
FEATURED READING >>>
- Report of the 37th Implementation Committee Meeting External site
Arabic| Chinese| English| French| Russian| Spanish
- Report of the 18th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol
External site
Arabic| Chinese| English| French| Russian| Spanish
FEATURED WEBSITE >>>
The NOAA Ozone Depleting Gas Index External site


15 January 2007

GLOBAL

1- Study shows extreme contrast in ozone losses at North, South Poles External site
Agence France Presse, 25 December 2006
NORTH AMERICA

2- Mustard proves good alternative to fumigant pesticides External site
PANUPS updates service
SOUTH ASIA
3- Singapore accedes to protocol amendment on ozone-depleting substances External site Channel News Asia, 11 January 2007
4- Outsize profits, and questions, in effort to cut warming gases External site

New York Times, By KEITH BRADSHER

LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN
5- La falta de ozono sigue acechando External site
La Nación (Chile), 25 de Diciembre de 2006
FEATURED READING >>>
Report of 2006 Scientific Assessment Panel External site
FEATURED WEBSITE >>>
-The International Ozone Commission ( IO3C) External site
The International Ozone Commission was established in 1948 as one of the special commissions of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, who represent the entire community of geophysical scientists around the world. The purpose of the IO3C is to help organize the study of ozone around the world, including ground-based and satellite measurement programs and analyses of the atmospheric chemistry and dynamical processes affecting ozone. The study of ozone is important because of the large role it plays in protecting the Earth from harmful levels of ultraviolet solar radiation and because of its role as a greenhouse gas in the Earth's climate system. Membership in IO3C is limited to approximately 30 of the leading scientists in the study of atmospheric processes from around the world. Membership is determined by an election of peers. Members serve for four years, with possible renewal for an additional term. The first president of the IO3C was Dr. George Dobson of Oxford University, a famous scientist who was a pioneer in the study of atmospheric ozone. Learn more >>>


 
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© UNEP DTIE 2007 | updated 22-jul-10